H1N1 Response Case Studies

Sunday, June 6
Lecture HallLecture Hall
1:00 – 1:50pm
Organizing a Mass H1N1 Vaccination Clinic in a Large Suburban Community

How do you mass vaccinate the residents of a major Washington D.C. suburban community with the television cameras rolling, the country watching, and 10,000 children all crying, “I want to go home!”  The answer is, very carefully with a broad-based community-wide planning effort.  This presentation will describe how the Fairfax County Health Department and a cadre of community volunteers planned and carried out three major mass vaccination clinics that quickly and effectively vaccinated approximately 20,000 high-risk clients over a three-day period.
Thomas Crow, RS, MSEH, Director of Environmental Health, Fairfax County Dept. of Health, Fairfax, VA and Technical Section Chair of Environmental Health and Leadership Development, National Environmental Health Association

2:00 – 2:50pm
Lessons learned by CDC – One Year From the H1N1 Outbreak

Now that it has been almost a year since H1N1 first appeared, what has the nation learned regarding what worked well and what didn’t in responding to H1N1? What measures are in place that will help the country deal more effectively with future outbreaks? Come hear about this from the world’s leading expert on this topic, Dr. Toby Merlin, Deputy Director of the Influenza Coordination Unit that oversees and coordinates domestic and international influenza preparedness activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Toby L. Merlin, MD, Deputy Director of the Influenza Coordination Unit, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

3:00 – 3:50pm
Open Panel Discussion: Community Response to H1N1 – Lessons Learned

What are the multitudes of issues, problems, and dilemmas environmental health professionals were faced with on the ground while responding to H1N1? How were they overcome? This panel session will discuss some of these challenges from the perspective of environmental health professionals from different parts of the country and from the federal government’s perspective, which will be provided by Dr. Toby Merlin. Attendees are also invited to discuss their own experiences.
Toby L. Merlin, MD, Deputy Director of the Influenza Coordination Unit, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (Speaker)
David Selvage, MHS, PA-C, Surveillance Team Leader, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health, Albuquerque, NM (Speaker)
Thomas Crow, RS, MSEH, Director of Environmental Health, Fairfax County Dept. of Health, Fairfax, VA and NEHA Technical Section Chair of Environmental Health and Leadership Development, National Environmental Health Association (Speaker)
Michéle Samarya-Timm, MA, REHS, CHES, DAAS, HO, Registered Environmental Health Specialist/Health Educator, Somerset County Dept. of Health, Somerville, NJ and NEHA Technical Section Chair of Food Safety and Protection (Moderator)

Monday, June 7
Lecture HallLecture Hall
8:30 – 9:20am
Local Sanitarian Response to H1N1: Responsibilities, Roles, and Lessons Learned

As the number of cases of H1N1 Pandemic Influenza increased in 2009, the environmental health role in support of the largest public health event in decades began to develop. This session will focus on the planning and response efforts of two local public health agencies located in the same county and the responsibilities and roles environmental health professionals performed in this clinically-based public health community response.
Beth Ransopher, RS, Public Health Program Manager II/Workforce Development Coordinator, Columbus Public Health, Columbus, OH
Paul Rosile, MPH, RS, Director of Environmental Health, Franklin County Board of Health, Columbus, OH
Charles D. Broschart, RS, Supervisor of Community Environmental Health Services, Franklin County Board of Health, Columbus, OH
Matthew Caudill, BA, EMT-P, Cities Readiness Initiative Coordinator, Franklin County Board of Health, Columbus, OH

9:30 – 10:20am
H1N1 – Is This An Emergency Management Response?

When a disease outbreak occurs in a community, where does local government turn to for assistance? The flu? This isn’t a tornado, earthquake or hurricane! What can the local Emergency Manager bring to the table? Coordination of response and resources are pertinent to any disaster. It doesn’t matter what the incident, some needs to be ‘running the show’. From this session, attendees will understand the role of emergency management before and during a disaster and gain an inside look into how local emergency management staff prepared and responded to a pandemic event.
Roger R. Tannen, NM-CEM, Deputy Chief/Emergency Manager, Bernalillo County Office of Emergency Management, Albuquerque, NM

10:30 – 11:20am
Lessons Learned from Pandemic Planning and the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic – New Mexico Department of Health’s Self Assessment

Despite years of planning, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic challenged the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH). Fortunately, this pandemic was mild by historical standards. How NMDOH would have fared during a more severe pandemic is uncertain. In this session, attendees will explore the challenges faced by NMDOH and other state health departments in responding to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, how NMDOH has begun to evaluate its performance during the pandemic, and the results of NMDOH’s evaluation efforts.
David Selvage, MHS, PA-C, Surveillance Team Leader, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Bureau, New Mexico Department of Health, Albuquerque, NM

 

 

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