Indian Health Service

Sunday, June 6
Lecture HallLecture Hall
1:00 – 1:50pm
History of the Indian Health Service, Division of Environmental Health Services

This presentation will highlight the historic roots and history of the Indian Health Service Division of Environmental Health Services through historic photos, documents, and oral history interviews to describe the circumstances and events that lead to the establishment of an environmental health program in the Indian Health Service. Key milestones that lead to the current program will also be described. 
Alan J. Dellapenna, Jr., RS, MPH, DAAS, Historian, Indian Health Service, Rockville, MD

2:00 – 2:50pm
Indian Health Service: Preventing, Mitigating, and the Remediation Air, Water, and Soil Contamination
The Indian Health Service Division of Environmental Health has a long history of working in prevention, mitigation, and remediation of air, water, and soil contamination through technical consulting on Tribal Lands. How do they do it without using enforcement?  Learn more about their roles and responsibilities at this session.
Leisa Cook, BS, MBA, RS, Director, Division of Environmental Health Services, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM

3:00 – 3:50pm
Sanitary Surveys on Tribal Lands: An Indian Health Service Model for Success
How does a non-regulatory agency encourage a community to improve their water, sewer, and solid waste infrastructure?  This is the challenge faced by the Indian Health Service, Office of Environmental Health and Engineering (OEHE) in working with Tribal utility departments.  This presentation details how Albuquerque Area OEHE staff conduct comprehensive sanitary surveys of Tribal water, sewer, and solid waste systems, to encourage improvements to protect public health, promote sustainability, and ensure compliance with federal regulations.
LT Katie Noonan Hubbard, REHS, Environmental Health Specialist, Indian Health Service, Santa Fe, NM
LCDR Leigh P. Hubbard III, PE, MS, Field Engineer, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM

Monday, June 7
Lecture HallLecture Hall
1:00 – 1:50pm
Indian Health Service and First Nations Inuit Health Environmental Health Officer Exchange Program
As part of their Environmental Health (EH) Officer Recruitment and Retention Strategies, First Nations Inuit Health and Indian Health Service EH Officers had an opportunity to participate in a work exchange. Exchanges provide an opportunity to share expertise and lessons learned and to identify best practices for the management and delivery of environmental public health programs. Two Canadians and two U.S. EH Officers crossed their borders and discovered differences and similarities in performing EH services for indigenous populations. This session will enable attendees to compare and contrast the top EH priorities of First Nations Inuit people in Alberta with American Indian and Alaska Natives in Oklahoma City Area; compare and contrast the risk communication methods used in Alberta and Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service; and explore different methods used in Alberta and Oklahoma City Area to get community input into EH priorities. 
CDR Danny Walters, RS, MPH, Institutional Environmental Health Officer, Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Oklahoma City, OK

3:00 – 3:50pm
Development and Implementation of Public Health Interventions for Formaldehyde – FEMA Trailers in Tribal Communities

Formaldehyde is recognized as a possible carcinogen. The Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service (AAIHS) Office of Environmental Health and Engineering and the Jicarilla Apache Nation collaborated to develop and implement a multi-disciplinary intervention to reduce formaldehyde exposures in FEMA trailers, which were provided to Tribal Communities served by the AAIHS.  Throughout the process, this Team utilized the essential public health services to educate, investigate, and develop procedures to protect the health of tribal communities. This session will provide examples of the benefits of a multi-disciplinary collaboration during an environmental health intervention; enable attendees to understand and apply the process in interpreting results and making recommendations when existing recommendations are not readily available; and discuss how many of the 10 Essential Public Health Services were utilized in this intervention and among the various participants.
Ray Kenmotsu, RS, Environmental Health Officer, Indian Health Service, Taos, NM
Brian E. Hroch, MPH, CIH, CSP, REHS, Industrial Hygiene and Safety Manager, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM
Cordell TeCube, Director, Environmental Protection Office, Jicarilla Apache Nation, Dulce, NM

4:00 – 4:50pm
Pandemic Preparedness and Response in the Indian Health Service
On April 23, 2009, seven H1N1 cases were reported in California and Texas. The Indian Health Service provides direct patient and public health services to Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. As with the rest of the world, a potential pandemic and a “year long” flu season threatened Native Americans served by the Albuquerque Area of the Indian Health Service, as well as AAIHS continuity of operations. This session will enable attendees to explore the benefits of increased surveillance, planning and communications in public health preparedness, investigate the various components of pandemic preparedness in healthcare systems, and understand the various components of community outreach and mitigation in pandemic preparedness.
Brian E. Hroch, MPH, CIH, CSP, REHS, Industrial Hygiene and Safety Manager, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM
Leisa Cook, BS, MBA, RS, Director, Division of Environmental Health Services, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM
CDR Darrell LaRoche, PE, Director, Emergency Services, Head Quarters, Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, NM

 

 

"The NEHA AEC & Exhibition is the place to be for influencing the future of the environmental health industry, advancing yourself as an environmental health professional, recognizing excellence within the profession, and connecting with your colleagues. The conference serves to advance the science, the practice, and the practitioner of environmental health by providing education and motivation through knowledge sharing and networking."

National Environmental Health Association, 720 S Colorado Blvd., Suite 1000-N, Denver, CO 80246-1926
Phone:  303.756.9090, Fax:  303.691.9490