Onsite Wastewater Systems

Monday, June 7
Lecture HallLecture Hall
1:00 – 1:50pm
OSTDS and Central Sewer Disposal: Sustainability and Best Practices in Florida

Most environmental health professionals have strong opinions about which sewer method is more sustainable: central sewage disposal or on-site sewage disposal. The answer is: It depends. This session will present both sides of the question and give concrete examples from Florida of the long-term effects of these decisions including implications for water quality and land use decisions. The audience will be invited to participate in what is expected to be a lively discussion.
Sandra Whitehead, PhD, Environmental Public Health Planner, Florida Dept. of Health, Tallahassee, FL
Elke Ursin, Environmental Health Program Consultant, Bureau of Onsite Sewage Programs, Florida Dept. of Health, Tallahassee, FL

3:00 – 3:50pm
Leaping from the Year 1950 to the Year 2010 in a Single Bound: The Dramatic Transformation of a Rural County's Onsite Wastewater Program

Learn how a rural Northern California county with an onsite wastewater program based on the 1957 USPHS Manual of Septic Tank Practice was transformed to become a leading-edge program based on the most current science and technology. Hear the drama, meet the heroes, feel the anxiety, experience the excitement, and observe the pitfalls of the journey!
Brad Banner, REHS, Member of the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of the California Onsite Wastewater Association, Environmental Health Director, Butte County Public Health Department, Oroville, CA
Nick Weigel, PE, Principal Engineer, Northstar Engineering, Chico, CA

4:00 – 4:50pm
The Influence of Soil Type and Vertical Separation Distance on Septic System Wastewater Treatment

Nitrogen and bacteria concentrations in groundwater adjacent to 16 septic systems in three different soil types was monitored for 15 months to determine the influence of soil type and separation distance on wastewater treatment efficiency. Come see and hear the results of this monitoring. By attending this session, attendees will be able to list the common components of a septic system, identify factors associated with septic system wastewater treatment efficiency, and develop guidelines for septic systems design based on research data.
Charles P. Humphrey, NC Licensed Soil Scientist, RS, Instructor, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Monday, June 7
Learning LabLearning Laboratory
8:00am – 12:00noon
Onsite Wastewater Systems Field Trip

This field trip will take you to several onsite wastewater treatment systems in the Albuquerque area. This is an outdoor field trip, so please wear the appropriate footwear and plan for the weather by bringing items such as sunscreen, water and a hat. Cost for the tour is $25 before May 14 and $30 after May 14. The bus will pick-up attendees from the Albuquerque Convention Center, in front of the West Building on 3rd Street at 7:30am.

Tuesday, June 8
Learning LabLearning Laboratory
8:30 – 9:20am
Ready, Set, Flush: Removing Raw Sewage From Our Water
Human raw sewage enters lakes and streams from straight pipes and non-compliant septic systems. A facilitator with the SE Minnesota Wastewater Initiative will share how they provide educational and technical assistance to help small unsewered communities. Learn strategies for working with communities and about the community process for getting the citizens involved.  The facilitator will share information about their successes at getting a community started, finding solutions and helping get the wastewater improvements completed.
Sheila Craig, Med, Community Sewage Treatment Facilitator, Southeast Minnesota Wastewater Initiative, Preston, MN

9:30 – 10:20am
Administration of the Onsite Wastewater Training, Certification, and Renewal Program for a State Agency
In April 2004, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection transferred the Title 5 (state onsite sanitary code) Onsite Wastewater Training and Certification program for Soil Evaluators and System Inspectors programs to NEIWPCC. NEIWPCC conducts the training and certifications as well as chairing of an Onsite Advisory Committee (OAC) to oversee these efforts. In addition, NEIWPCC was responsible for the creation and implementation of a renewal and continuing education program where no such program existed for these professionals. The experiences and lessons learned by NEIWPCC since the inception of this program will be discussed in this presentation.
Tom Groves, Director of Wastewater and Onsite Programs, NEIWPCC, Lowell, MA

10:30 – 11:20am
After the Storm: Helping a Rural Community Re-Build

What do you do when a small rural community with non-compliant onsite systems is devastated by a hurricane and the citizens are asking the health department to allow them to re-build? This presentation will showcase the step-by-step process, which the Virginia Department of Health utilized to bring this area into compliance, as well as the cooperative efforts of multiple agencies in achieving a very positive economic and environmentally sound outcome for the community.
Amy D. Pemberton, AOSE, Environmental Health Supervisor, Virginia Dept. of Health, Williamsburg, VA
Carrie S. Schmidt, Community Programs Director, USDA - Rural Development, Richmond, VA

1:00 – 1:50pm
On-Site Wastewater System O&M – Protecting Investments, Ground Water, and Public Health in Clark County, WA
Educational session sponsored by NSF International
Clark County’s O&M program is doing what it was intended to do—help homeowners catch early signs of septic failure and strengthen groundwater protection in Clark County. Attend this session and learn a structure for developing a logic model for an environmental health program, explore Clark County’s successful Onsite Sewage System Operation and Maintenance Program and learn about program evaluation and performance measures.
Thomas R. Gonzales, MPH, REHS, Program Manager, Clark County Public Health, Vancouver, WA

2:00 – 2:50pm
Water Pollution Problems in Perú, South America
The primary objective of this presentation is to offer an overview of current water pollution problems observed in Perú, primarily in Lima, Perú. The presentation will be based on the author’s experience during a one-month visit of teaching and research at the Pontifical Catholic University of Perú. The city does not have any major wastewater treatment plants. The wastewater produced by the city’s inhabitants is currently discarded into rivers and the Pacific Ocean. Pictures and documentation of these water pollution problems will be presented.
Eliezer Bermúdez, PhD, CP-FS, Associate Professor, Department of Health, Safety, and Environmental Health Sciences, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN

3:00 – 5:30pm
Panel Discussion: Product Registration - How and Why?

In what is sure to be a lively discussion, manufacturers and regulators will join together to discuss the sometimes contentious process of product approval.
Richard Otis, President, Otis Environmental Consultants, LLC, Madison, WI (Moderator)
Tom Groves, Director of Wastewater and Onsite Programs, NEIWPCC, Lowell, MA (Speaker)
James Bell, Executive Vice President, BioMicrobics Inc., Shawnee, KS (Panelist)
Colin Bishop, Head of Government Relations and Business Development, Bord Na Mona, Greensboro, NC (Panelist)
Barb McCarthy, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minnesota (Panelist)
Tom Brandt, New Mexico Environment Department, Santa Fe, New Mexico (Panelist)

 

 

"The NEHA AEC & Exhibition is the place to be for influencing the future of the environmental health industry, advancing yourself as an environmental health professional, recognizing excellence within the profession, and connecting with your colleagues. The conference serves to advance the science, the practice, and the practitioner of environmental health by providing education and motivation through knowledge sharing and networking."

National Environmental Health Association, 720 S Colorado Blvd., Suite 1000-N, Denver, CO 80246-1926
Phone:  303.756.9090, Fax:  303.691.9490