Solid Waste

Monday, June 7
Lecture HallLecture Hall
1:00 – 1:50pm
Estimating Health Impacts of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Emissions from a Construction and Demolition Debris Landfill

Hydrogen sulfide emissions from construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills can pose a serious threat to human health. The production of hydrogen sulfide occurs in C&D landfills through the anaerobic breakdown of calcium sulfate, which comprises approximately 90% of gypsum drywall. Once considered solely a nuisance issue from the breakdown of inert waste, there is a growing awareness of both the potential of C&D landfills to emit hydrogen sulfide and the subsequent health effects of exposure.  From this session, attendees will learn to define what construction and demolition debris landfills are and appreciate their potential to impact ambient air. Additionally the presentation will identify and employ additional methods for estimating human exposures to landfill gas emissions and explain the potential public health implications of exposure.
Michelle A. Colledge, MPH, PhD, Environmental Health Scientist, CDC/NCEH/ATSDR, Chicago, IL

3:00 – 3:50pm
Potential Health and Sustainability Impacts of Community Engagement in Land Cleanup and Reuse
Clean up and reuse of contaminated sites may reduce exposure and may also lead to community benefits such as improved housing, increased greenspace, the establishment of recreational facilities, and new businesses. Involving the community in cleanup plans builds capacity and may be a crucial component to achieving these impacts. This presentation describes two new initiatives at EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response aimed to strengthen our focus in both these areas.
Robin Schafer, PhD, AAAS fellow, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, U.S. EPA, Washington, DC

4:00 – 4:50pm
An Overview of Landfill Gas Energy in the United States
This presentation will explain how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP) is helping to promote the use of methane gas from landfills as clean, renewable energy, and will also provide information on the state of landfill gas energy projects in the United States, as well as typical technologies, costs, and sources of funding for these projects.
Brent Dieleman, Project Professional, SCS Engineers (contractor to U.S. EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program), Reston, VA  

 

 

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National Environmental Health Association, 720 S Colorado Blvd., Suite 1000-N, Denver, CO 80246-1926
Phone:  303.756.9090, Fax:  303.691.9490