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Acknowledgments

The author, Francesca Lyman, wishes to thank the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) for providing the funds to do this report. Based in London, England, the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH), founded in 1883, is a professional and educational body, dedicated to the promotion of environmental health and to encouraging the highest possible standards in the training and the work of environmental health professionals.

In addition, she feels it is important to also acknowledge the contributions of Nelson Fabian, NEHA Executive Director, as well as NEHA’s ad-hoc ‘Lessons Learned committee,’ which comprise NEHA’s board of directors, chaired by Thomas R. Ward, R.S., Environmental Health Director, Union County Health Department, Monroe, NC. The members of this committee, i.e. the board of directors in 2003, include Thomas R. Ward, R.S., Environmental Health Director, Union County Health Department, Monroe, NC., Richard Gabriel, Sr. , E.H.S. of the North Central District Health Department in Lewiston, Idaho, James Michael Phillips, of the Combined Health District of Montgomery County, Dayton, Ohio, and Patrick J. Maloney, R.S., M.P.A.H., Environmental Health Director, Brookline Health Department, Brookline, MA. NEHA, a professional society for practitioners of environmental health, today has 5,000 members, and offers a variety of programs that are all in keeping with the association's mission, which is as relevant today as it was when the organization was founded in 1937. The mission of the National Environmental Health Association is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all."

 

The author wishes to express her deepest sympathy and continuing concern for the families of the victims and for survivors of the terror attacks September 11, 2001—including those tens of thousands of workers and residents whose health may have been impaired as a result of smoke and dust inhalation in the New York City metropolitan area.

 

The following persons were interviewed for this report and/or reviewed it. They are listed in the positions they held at the time they participated.

 

Richard Cole, Arlington County environmental health specialist; Lauri Boni, Mt. Sinai Medical Center; Richard Jackson, Director, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Richard Borri, New York City Department of Health; Robert Martin, Legal Environmental Assistance Foundation, Tallahassee, Fla.; Claire Barnett, Healthy Schools Network, Albany, N.Y.; Angela Carter, EPA Region II; Thomas Cahill, scientist and professor, Department of Physics and Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, Davis; Jenna Orkin, 911 Environmental Action Group; Lynn Goldman, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health; Dr. Clifford Bassett, New York city allergy and asthma specialist;  Diane Downing, Nurse manager, Arlington County; Steven Markowitz, Center for the Biology of Natural Systems; Hugh Kaufman, chief investigator of the EPA Ombudsman program; Joseph (Chip) Hughes, NIEHS; Kelly McKinney, New York City Department of Health, Environmental Health Division; Jason Bailowitz, office of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York City; Val Jefferson, Arlington County Environmental Health Department; Mark Penn, Arlington County Emergency Operations; Glenn Rutherford, Arlington County Health Department; Dodie Gill, Employee Assistance Program, Arlington County, Va..; Joel Shufro, New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH); Joe Davis, Society of Environmental Journalists; Dave Newman, NYCOSH; Carrie Loewenhertz; NYCOSH; Jonathan Bennett, NYCOSH; Paul Bartlett, Center for the Biology of Natural Systems; Eric Schmeltzer, Jerrold Nadler’s office; Lisette Morton, Jerrold Nadler’s office; Howard Bader, Certified Industrial Hygienists; Michele Robinson, NYC DOH; Luz Claudio, scientist; Sam Benson, Office of Emergency Management, NYC; Hugh Kaufman, EPA; Bruce Lippy, the International Union of Operating Engineers; Susan Stranahan, environmental journalist; Susan Huether Harris, Washington State first responder; Alison Geyh, Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Philip Landrigan, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine; Ron Burger, National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (CDC); Steve Touw, EPA Region II;  Monona Rossol, industrial hygienist, New York City; David Prezant, New York City Fire Department; Rachel Lidov, 9/11 Environmental Action Group; Gene Panhorst, lower Manhattan resident; John Harrald, disaster specialist, George Washington University; Shelley Hearne, director, Trust for America’s Health; Amy Kostant, Environmental Media Services; Jim O’Hara, Director, Health-Track; Marcy Gordon, New York city resident; Frederica Perera, professor of public health, Columbia University; Janet Kofer, office of Sen. Hillary Clinton; Vincent Forras, volunteer firefighter; Eric Goldstein, Natural Resources Defense Council attorney; Captain Terrance Revella, New York State Environmental Conservation Department Police; Kenneth Olden, director, NIEHS national toxicology program; Dr. Howard Frumkin, Rollins School of Public Health; Marilena Christodoulou; Kim Todd, Lower Manhattan resident; Paul Edwards, Lower Manhattan resident; Regan Heiserman, New York City resident working in financial district; Diane Miller, Lower Manhattan resident; Charlene Laino, MSNBC Health Editor;  Jessica Leighton, NYC DOH; Dr. Paul Lioy, Professor of Environmental and Community Medicine, EOHSI; Thomas Cahill, University of California at Davis; Patrick Meehan, Director, Division of Emergency Director, Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services,
National Center for Environmental Health, CDC; Jo Polett, New York city resident; Pat Dillon, Lower Manhattan resident;  Joel Kupferman, attorney with the New York Environmental Law and Justice Project; Joe Martyak, spokesman for EPA in Administrator Christie Whitman’s office; Kimberly Flynn, 9/11 Environmental Action Group; Stephen Levin, Medical Co-Director, World Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, and Medical Director, Mount Sinai-Irving J. Selikoff Clinical Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Steven Markowitz, Director, Center for the Biology of Natural Systems, Queens College; Anthony Sutton, Department of Emergency Services, Westchester County, N.Y.; Sandra Mullin, Associate Commissioner, Office of Public Affairs, New York City Department of Health; Jerrold Nadler, Member, Judiciary Committee, U.S. House of Representatives (D-N.Y.); Dan Weiller, spokesman for New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver; Julia Sommerfeld, MSNBC Health; Jackie Stenson, MSNBC Health; Steve Swaney, New York resident; Cate Jenkins, hazardous waste division, EPA; Michael Gerrard, environmental attorney, Arnold & Porter; Sgt. David Duffy, New York Police Department; Tom Barnett, New York Police Development; Mary Brosnahan, New York’s Coalition for the Homeless;  Dr. Neil Schachter, medical director of respiratory care,  Mt. Sinai Hospital; Mike Tobia, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; Dr. Mark Siegel, an assistant professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT.; Marjorie Clarke, an adjunct professor of environmental science at Hunter College; Bonnie Bellow, EPA Region II; Hans Hallman, a community affairs specialist at the New York State Emergency Management Office; Hallstead Harrison, professor of atmospheric chemistry, University of Washington; Marianne Horinko, EPA Acting Administrator; Molly Masland, Health Editor, MSNBC; Joanne Scigliano, National Environmental Health Association; and Barbara Wilkie, Environmental Health Network. Agencies refusing to comment: Occupational Safety and Health Administration; New York City Department of Design and Construction.