Journal of Environmental Health 2013 Abstracts - page 10

in any of the tested samples. A total of 45.2% of the food samples were received outside
of recommended temperatures. Findings draw attention to the ongoing need to improve
temperature control and hygienic practices, specifically hand-washing practices, in
restaurants.
Common Phenotypic and Genotypic Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns Found in a
Case Study of Multiresistant
E. coli
From Cohabitant Pets, Humans, and Household
Surfaces
Liliana Raquel Leite Martins, DVM,
Institute for the Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar,
Porto University
Susana Maria Rocha Pina, PhD,
Institute for the Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, Porto
University
Romeo Luís Rocha Simões, DVM,
Institute for the Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar,
Porto University
Augusto José Ferreira de Matos, DVM, PhD,
Institute for the Biomedical Sciences Abel
Salazar, Porto University
Pedro Rodrigues, PhD,
Institute for Molecular and Cell Biology
,
Porto University
Paulo Martins Rodrigues da Costa, DVM, PhD,
Center of Marine & Environment
Research
,
Porto University
Abstract
The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize the
antimicrobial resistance profiles among
E. coli
strains isolated from cohabitant pets and
humans, evaluating the concurrent colonization of pets, owners, and home surfaces by
bacteria carrying the same antimicrobial-resistant genes. The authors also intended to
assess whether household surfaces and objects could contribute to the within-household
antimicrobial-resistant gene diffusion between human and animal cohabitants. A total of
124
E. coli
strains were isolated displaying 24 different phenotypic patterns with a
remarkable percentage of multiresistant ones. The same resistance patterns were isolated
from the dog’s urine, mouth, the laundry floor, the refrigerator door, and the dog’s food
bowl. Some other multiresistant phenotypes, as long as resistant genes, were found
repeatedly in different inhabitants and surfaces of the house. Direct, close contact
between all the cohabitants and the touch of contaminated household surfaces and objects
could be an explanation for these observations.
Prevalence of
Legionella
Strains in Cooling Towers and Legionellosis Cases in New
Zealand
Robert Lau, PhD,
Massey University Wellington
Saadia Maqsood, MSc,
Massey University Wellington
David Harte, MSc,
Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Porirua, New
Zealand
Brian Caughley, MSc.
Massey University Wellington
Rob Deacon,
Environmental Laboratory Services, Lower Hutt, New Zealand
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