Journal of Environmental Health 2013 Abstracts - page 14

March 2013
Abstracts (75.7)
Copyright 2013, National Environmental Health Association
Persistence of
Salmonella
and
E. Coli
on the Surface of Restaurant Menus
Sujata A. Sirsat, PhD,
Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management
,
University of Houston
Jin-Kyung K. Choi, PhD,
Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management
,
Purdue
University
Barbara A. Almanza, PhD,
Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management
,
Purdue
University
Jack A. Neal, PhD,
Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management
,
University of Houston
Abstract
To the authors’ knowledge, the role of restaurant menus as a vehicle for
pathogens has not been explored. Menus, however, can pose as a vector for bacterial
contamination and transfer. Sampling menus from two restaurants in the Houston, Texas,
area showed the presence of up to 100 CFU/cm
2
aerobic bacteria. Follow-up studies
designed to investigate the ability of
Salmonella
and
E. coli
to persist on paper and
laminated menus at various time points (0, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours) demonstrated that
bacteria persist more efficiently on laminated menus as compared to paper menus.
Transfer studies performed to quantitatively determine the ability of bacteria to transfer
from menus to fingertips and from fingertips to clean menus showed that bacteria can be
transferred for up to 24 hours. The study described here showed that restaurant menus
may serve as vehicles for pathogens and hence present a public health issue within the
retail food environment.
Private Drinking Water Quality in Rural Wisconsin
Lynda Knobeloch, PhD,
Wisconsin Department of Health Services
Patrick Gorski, PhD,
Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene
Megan Christenson, MS, MPH,
Wisconsin Department of Health Services
Henry Anderson, MD,
Wisconsin Department of Health Services
Abstract
Between July 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, Wisconsin health departments
tested nearly 4,000 rural drinking water supplies for coliform bacteria, nitrate, fluoride,
and 13 metals as part of a state-funded program that provides assistance to low-income
families. The authors’ review of laboratory findings found that 47% of these wells had an
exceedance of one or more health-based water quality standards. Test results for iron and
coliform bacteria exceeded safe limits in 21% and 18% of these wells, respectively. In
addition, 10% of the water samples from these wells were high in nitrate and 11% had an
elevated result for aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, or strontium. The high
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