Journal of Environmental Health 2013 Abstracts - page 7

prematurity or fetal growth indicators. Total mercury, lead, and cadmium concentrations
were measured in 538 specimens of cord blood and correlated with demographic
characteristics and pregnancy outcomes for each mother-infant pair. Lead concentrations
determined in the cord blood of Rhode Island women (geometric mean 0.99 μg/dL) were
similar to those reported in U.S. biomonitoring studies. The overall geometric mean for
mercury concentration (0.52 μg/L) was slightly lower than in other comparable studies.
Cadmium concentrations were generally below the limit of detection. A statistically
significant correlation was detected between elevated mercury concentrations and racial
and ethnic characteristics of the study participants. Non-Hispanic African-American
mothers were 9.6 times more likely to have a mercury concentration ≥5.8 μg/L compared
to women of other racial/ethnic backgrounds. No association was detected between
elevated mercury levels and adverse birth outcomes.
Health and Safety Inspection of Hairdressing and Nail Salons by Local Authority
Environmental Health Practitioners
Joanne Harris-Roberts,
Human Sciences Unit and Centre for Workplace Health, Health
and Safety Laboratory
Jo Bowen,
Human Sciences Unit and Centre for Workplace Health, Health and Safety
Laboratory
Jade Sumner,
Human Sciences Unit and Centre for Workplace Health, Health and Safety
Laboratory
David Fishwick,
Human Sciences Unit and Centre for Workplace Health, Health and
Safety Laboratory
Abstract
The objective of the study described in this article was to provide environmental
health practitioners (EHPs) with an evaluation of the levels of understanding of, and
compliance with, health and safety legislation in hairdressing and nail salons. EHPs
carried out a series of inspections of 205 salons in a large British city, consisting of a site
assessment and an assessment of employee knowledge of relevant regulations, including
those relating to control of exposure to hazardous substances.
Two-fifths of senior salon employees understood Control of Substances
Hazardous to Health (COSHH) assessments and could provide evidence of their
completion. Most employees had been trained and made aware of the health hazards
associated with carrying out their work and took suitable precautions to protect
themselves and their clients.
The results suggest that senior employees within the salons sampled, have
knowledge of the risks to health and have been taking measures to control these risks.
Initiatives such as the Health and Safety Executive’s (in collaboration with local
authorities and the hairdressing industry) “Bad Hand Day?” campaign and sector-specific
COSHH essentials guidance help raise awareness levels and aim to support good control
practice in salons.
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