Journal of Environmental Health 2014 Abstracts - page 12

confidence interval [
CI
] = 40.34%–49.24%) of the soil samples tested positive for
nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths.
Ascaris lumbricoides
was the most
common helminth with a prevalence rate of 35% (95%
CI
= 30.73%–39.27%).
Mixed occurrence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths was 10.21%. Although
the community playgrounds had a higher prevalence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted
helminths than the waterfront (
p
> .05), more cases of mixed occurrence of
nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths occurred in the waterfront than the
community playgrounds (
p
> .05). The wet season had a higher prevalence rate of
nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths than the dry season (
p
< .05). The observed
high prevalence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths in soil is considered a
potential public health risk to swimmers and children playing outdoors in the
Yenagoa metropolis.
Risk Assessment of Rooftop-Collected Rainwater for Individual Household and
Community Use in Central Kerala, India
Y. Jesmi, MPhil,
School of Environmental Sciences
,
Mahatma Gandhi University
K.M. Mujeeb Rahiman, PhD,
School of Marine Sciences
,
Cochin University of Science
and Technology
A.A.M. Hatha, PhD,
School of Marine Sciences
,
Cochin University of Science and
Technology
Lal Deepu, MSc,
School of Marine Sciences
,
Cochin University of Science and
Technology
S. Jyothi, MSc,
School of Environmental Sciences
,
Mahatma Gandhi University
Abstract
Water quality of rooftop-collected rainwater is an issue of increased interest
particularly in developing countries where the collected water is used as a source of
drinking water. Bacteriological and chemical parameters of 25 samples of rooftop-
harvested rainwater stored in ferrocement tanks were analyzed in the study described in
this article. Except for the pH and lower dissolved oxygen levels, all other
physicochemical parameters were within World Health Organization guidelines.
Bacteriological results revealed that the rooftop-harvested rainwater stored in tanks does
not often meet the bacteriological quality standards prescribed for drinking water. Fifty
percent of samples of harvested rainwater for rural and urban community use and 20% of
the samples for individual household use showed the presence of
E.
coli
. Fecal
coliform/fecal streptococci ratios revealed nonhuman animal sources of fecal pollution.
Risk assessment of bacterial isolates from the harvested rainwater showed high resistance
to ampicillin, erythromycin, penicillin, and vancomycin. Multiple antibiotic resistance
(MAR) indexing of the isolates and elucidation of the resistance patterns revealed that
73% of the isolates exhibited MAR.
Concentration Gradient Patterns of Traffic and Non-Traffic-Generated Fine and
Coarse Aerosol Particles
C. Sparks, MS,
Department of Environmental Health
,
University of Cincinnati
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