Air Quality

Tracking and Air Quality

Asthma is a disease that can affect your lungs and make breathing difficult.  In the United States, about 25 million people live with asthma. That’s about one out of every 12 people.  Asthma affects people of all genders, races and ages.  For some people, symptoms only appear when they are exposed to something that irritates their breathing.  Other people have a kind of asthma that makes breathing difficult all of the time. We know that there is a connection between exposure to air pollution and asthma symptoms. For example, many adults and children with asthma are more likely to have symptoms when ozone and particle pollution are in the air. The National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is helping us understand the connection between outdoor air quality and asthma. By tracking asthma-related hospital admissions and the number of people reporting they live with asthma, the Tracking Network is helping identify high-risk groups and shaping asthma prevention efforts. 

What We Are Learning from the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network

Understanding the burden of asthma involves collecting data about people diagnosed and living with asthma and also collecting data about people who experience asthma attacks.  These data can then be analyzed and shared with key stakeholders.

  • The Tracking Network includes data about people who have been told by a physician that they have asthma and the number of hospital stays for asthma.
  • This information can provide estimates about the people who are affected by asthma and where they may receive care for asthma related issues.  These estimates can be used to plan and evaluate asthma control efforts.  Many of these asthma control efforts are coordinated by CDC’s National Asthma Control Program.
  • Data in the Tracking Network show that the number of asthma hospital admissions increased from 2007 to 2009 for several states reporting into the system. Having this information can alert public health and medical professionals to look for additional asthma prevention education opportunities.

Other Communication Tools

World EH Day

World Environmental Health Day on September 26, 2016 GraphicNEHA is planning to celebrate World Environmental Health Day on September 26, along with the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH) and many other organizations to shed light on the important work of environmental health around the world.

Breathing Easy: Monitoring Air Quality in Ice Arenas

In December 2014, a carbon monoxide poisoning event at a Wisconsin ice rink sent over 90 people to the emergency room. How can public health do better to prevent mass carbon monoxide poisoning events from happening in the future?

In this webinar, we’ll cover details about the epidemiological investigation of the December 2014 event and resources for ice rink managers, parents, and coaches.

TO REGISTER:

Complete this short Google form: bit.ly/icerinkwebinar.

Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story

Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people’s level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing.

Gender Differences in Respiratory Health of School Children Exposed to Rail Yard–Generated Air Pollution: The ENRRICH Study

Studies about environmental burdens often explore overall community risk. Increasing evidence suggests, however, differential burdens by gender and age. The purpose of the authors’ research was to determine if gender-related difference exists among children in a region plagued with poor air quality and if increased exposure to pollutants from a major goods movement rail yard influences the relationship. Using a cross-sectional study design, the authors provided respiratory screening for children at two elementary schools.

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