Food Safety

HACCP Basics for the Fresh and Fresh-Cut Produce Industry

Course Overview:

HACCP Basics for the Fresh and Fresh-cut Produce Industries is an online, self-paced course on the HACCP System and its prerequisites. The course is designed to assist participants in implementing a legally mandated food safety plan for bringing the safest possible raw vegetables and fruits to market and is accredited by the International HACCP Alliance.

Who Should Take the Course?

  • Food safety personnel;
  • HACCP Team Members;
  • Quality Control and Assurance personnel;
  • Production managers and staff;
  • Anyone who is a food safety trainer or auditor.

Course Objectives:

The course curriculum consists of 12 modules covering topics on meeting government, industry, and auditor requirements for the development of a working HACCP plan, including Good Agricultural and Manufacturing Practices as well as the Food Safety Modernization Act. 

Course Structure: The course is structured into 11 modules which included:

  1. Module 01 - What is HACCP?
  2. Module 02 - How big of a problem is foodborne Illness? Who is at risk?
  3. Module 03 - Hazards covered in HACCP- Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points
  4. Module 04 - Which illnesses can result from eating contaminated foods?
  5. Module 05 - What conditions do pathogens need to survive and grow in foods?
  6. Module 06 - HACCP - The overview
  7. Module 07 - HACCP prerequisites for agriculture
  8. Module 08 - HACCP prerequisites for processing of produce
  9. Module 09 - Your product and how it flows through your operation
  10. Module 10 - HACCP Principles 1-2-3 Hazard Analysis, Critical Control Points, Critical Limits
  11. Module 11 - HACCP principles 4-5-6 Monitoring, Corrective Actions, Verification
  12. Module 12 - HACCP principle 7 Record Keeping, Training and Audits

Evaluation Process:

At the end of each module, there is a test. Participants must successfully complete the test before continuing to the next module. Participants that do not achieve 80% can review the module content and try as many times as necessary to advance and complete the course. Test questions are randomly selected from a test bank, making each test unique. 

Upon successfully completing all modules, there is a printable certificate for your records.

Course Duration:

This online course is self-paced. Participants may leave the course at anytime and can resume where they left off. The duration will depend on the individual participant and their prior knowledge of the subject matter. On average, the timeline for completion will be between 1-1.5 hours per module.

Price:

$219.99 (USD), Bulk dicsounts available.

Register for Online Training

EH Topics: 

HACCP Basics for Processors and Manufacturers

Online Self Paced HACCP CourseCourse Overview:

HACCP Basics for Processors and Manufacturers is an online, self-paced course on the HACCP System and its prerequisites. The course focus is on the HACCP method to prevent unwanted hazards from being introduced into your manufacturing or processing operations. The course is recognized and accredited by the International HACCP Alliance.

Who Should Take the Course:

  • Food safety personnel;
  • HACCP Team Members;
  • Quality Control and Assurance personnel;
  • Production managers and staff;
  • Anyone who is a food safety trainer or auditor.

Course Objectives:

The course curriculum consists of 11 modules covering topics on meeting government, industry, and auditor requirements for the development of a working HACCP plan, including Good Manufacturing Practices as well as the Food Safety Modernization Act. Course Structure: The course is structured into 11 modules which included:

  1. Module 01 - What is HACCP?
  2. Module 02 - How Big of a problem is Foodborne Illness? Who is at Risk for Foodborne Illness?
  3. Module 03 - Hazards covered in 'HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT'
  4. Module 04 - Which illnesses can result from eating contaminated foods?
  5. Module 05 - What conditions do pathogens need to survive and grow in foods?
  6. Module 06 - HACCP - The Overview
  7. Module 07 - HACCP Prerequisites - The Foundation to Build On
  8. Module 08 - Developing your HACCP PLAN
  9. Module 09 - HACCP Principles 1-2-3 Hazard Analysis, Critical Control Points, Critical Limits
  10. Module 10 - HACCP Principles 4-5-6 Monitoring, Corrective Actions, Verification
  11. Module 11 - HACCP Principle 7 Record Keeping, Training and Audits

 

Evaluation Process:

At the end of each module, there is a test. Participants must successfully complete the test before continuing to the next module. Participants that do not achieve 80% can review the module content and try as many times as necessary to advance and complete the course. Test questions are randomly selected from a test bank, making each test unique. 

Upon successfully completing all modules, there is a printable certificate for your records.

Course Duration:

This online course is self-paced. Participants may leave the course at anytime and can resume where they left off. The duration will depend on the individual participant and their prior knowledge of the subject matter. On average, the timeline for completion will be between 1-1.5 hours per module.

Price:

$219.99 (USD), Bulk dicsounts available.

Register for Online Training

EH Topics: 

Food Safe Schools Program

NEHA’s Food-Safe Schools (FSS) Program with the support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (USDA/FNS), Kansas State University Center of Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child Nutrition Programs, and other partner organizations is dedicated to improving the health, education, and well-being of young people. Many NEHA members are state and local environmental health (EH) and food safety (FS) regulators whose responsibilities also include school inspections. EH and FS professionals interact with school nutrition/food service professionals before, during, and after inspections and emphasize food safety education as well as following food safety requirements and principles. This role as food safety regulator and educator gives NEHA members a specific and unique connection with schools.

 

Culture of Food Safety

NEHA works with USDA/FNS to collaborate with school nutrition/food service departments to promote food safety practices. EH/FS professionals who conduct school food safety inspections have an opportunity to foster and strengthen their relationship with school nutrition/food service personnel and provide education and resources to promote a culture of food safety.

 

Food-Safe Schools

Food-safe schools take a school-wide approach to food safety, and with the help of partners in the school community, create a culture of food safety. Food-safe schools have two main ingredients.

  • They are built on comprehensive procedures, policies, and plans that address the science of food safety.
  • They address people’s behavior to encourage the use of food safety procedures, policies, and plans.

 

Food-Safe Schools Action Guide: Creating a Culture of Food Safety

The Action Guide will assist schools in: reviewing their current food safety efforts, taking action to build food-safe schools by addressing important areas of food safety, and communicating with the school community to create a culture of food safety. A “culture of food safety” is thinking of the school community’s behaviors and beliefs about food safety. There will be a culture of food safety when food-safe behaviors are second nature to the members of the school community—the school nutrition team, school administrators, teachers, parents, and students—and these behaviors are consistently practiced to help keep students healthy and safe.

 

The Action Guide addresses food safety requirements for the National School Lunch Act, a school food safety program based on HACCP principles, training and education, employee health and personal hygiene, produce safety, managing food allergies, food defense, responding to food recalls, and responding to a foodborne illness outbreak.

 

For more information, please email Programs@neha.org.

 

Food-Safe Schools Program Resources

EH Topics: 

Certified Professional - Food Safety (CP-FS) Credential

Certified Professional - Food Safety (CP-FS) Credential - Chefs in commercial kitchen

Who Should Apply?

CP-FS credential holders may be employed in any retail food environment — as a quality assurance or quality control manager, facility manager, food-safe chemical supplier, or in a more traditional food safety position such as a regulatory inspector/investigator. CP-FS holders are able to conduct facility plan reviews, evaluate hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) plans or other risk-based food safety programs, understand the causes and prevention of foodborne illnesses, and analyze and implement sanitation standard operating procedures for safety and effectiveness.

Apply now

Eligibility Requirements

  • Degree Track
    • Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent
  • Experience Track
    • Associate’s degree and 4 years of experience, and successful passage of the CPFM, FSMCE, or ServSafe exam
    • High School Diploma and 5 years of experience, and successful passage of the CPFM, FSMCE, or ServSafe exam

This information is a brief overview of the eligibility requirements. For complete details, please see the Candidate Information Brochure (CIB) for more information.

Price

Member: US $245

Non-member: US $390

APPLY NOW

CP-FS Credential Exam and Application

Candidate Information Brochure (PDF)

 


A Professional Credential From NEHA

NEHA developed the CP-FS credential to meet the growing need for professionals who have specialized knowledge and training in the protection and safety of food. The importance of food safety is recognized along the continuum of training from food handler to food safety manager, and the next step for professionals who want to advance their careers in food safety is obtaining the CP-FS credential.

The CP-FS credential is designed for individuals within the public and private sectors who have prior food safety experience, and it integrates food microbiology, HACCP principles, and regulatory requirements to validate problem solving and knowledge expertise using real-world examples. This prestigious credential is well respected throughout the industry, and is highly valued by employers when hiring food safety professionals.

As an impartial, third-party endorsement of an individual’s professional knowledge and experience, a credential stands in support of a candidate’s resume and professional references. It serves as verification that a professional has achieved a baseline level of competency in his or her subject matter. Food safety professionals must understand local, state, national, and global regulations that affect their facility operations. The benefit of obtaining a nationally recognized credential is the transferability across state lines, and the requirement for continuing education to maintain the credential ensures that the professional is up-to-date on the most recent changes affecting the industry.

EH Topics: 

Certified in Comprehensive Food Safety (CCFS) Credential

Certified in Comprehensive Food Safety (CCFS) - Woman with clipboard

A Professional Credential From NEHA

NEHA has been training professionals in food safety since 1937 as part of the knowledge and skills required of Registered Environmental Health Specialists/Registered Sanitarians (REHS/RS). NEHA’s well-grounded history in food safety means our standards are high and that individuals with a NEHA credential have mastered a body of knowledge and acquired practical experience to perform relevant work responsibilities.

As an impartial, third-party endorsement of an individual’s professional knowledge and experience, a credential stands in support of a candidate’s resume and professional references. It serves as verification that a professional has achieved a baseline level of competency in his or her subject matter. Food safety professionals must understand local, state, national, and global regulations that affect their facility operations. The benefit of obtaining a nationally recognized credential is the transferability across state lines, and the requirement for continuing education to maintain the credential ensures that the professional is up-to-date on the most recent changes affecting the industry.

Stand Out in the World of Food Safety

The Food Safety Modernization Act has recast the food safety landscape adding to the arsenal of required knowledge for those involved in any aspect of the food supply chain. The National Environmental Health Association’s (NEHA’s) Certified in Comprehensive Food Safety (CCFS) credential is a mark of distinction for more seasoned food safety professionals who aim to demonstrate expertise in the manufacturing and processing areas, whether in a regulatory/oversight role or in a food safety management or compliance position within the private sector.

Hunger for Knowledge

Upon successfully passing the exam, the CCFS credential holder is prepared to manage and evaluate food safety plans in food manufacturing and processing facilities to assure a safe food supply for consumers. They are accomplished in understanding and implementing preventative controls, conducting risk assessments, observing and training staff, assessing the physical facility, and assuring corrective measures are applied to control hazards and prevent foodborne illness. With today’s complex global food supply, ensuring the safety of the supply chain requires collaboration between retail, manufacturing, and food service distribution companies, as well as others. NEHA’s involvement with policy and these types of collaborations in the food industry occurs on many levels and ensures that the food safety credentials it offers serves professionals who work in a variety of settings, is relevant to their jobs, and remains current to keep pace with frequent changes in the industry.

 

CCFS Credential Exam and Application

CCFS Credential Candidate Information Brochure (PDF)

 

EH Topics: 

Verification Times Two: How Do Food Managers Verify Food Safety

As food safety professionals, we have used traditional observational inspection techniques to evaluate a food operation's procedures and training during inspections. Until now, there has not been a clear method for evaluating the verification component of an operation’s food safety systems. This session will engage you in the discovery of FBI risk factors through the use of new behavioral-based food safety interview tools. You'll compare the snapshot observational approach to the discussion/interview approach. Explore how you can integrate these techniques into your daily inspections.

Using Underreporting Estimates to Mobilize the Development of Targeted, Proactive Food Safety Policy

Public health policy targeting populations at greatest risk can be used to significantly reduce the burden of foodborne disease. This study calculated incidence rates, disability adjusted life years, and quality adjusted life years estimates for salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis, adjusted for underreporting. Investigators then looked at how these measures of disease burden can contribute to the policy debate on the public health significance of foodborne disease.

Using FDA's Risk Factor Study to Enhance Retail Food Safety Effectiveness

Do you know if food establishments are doing all they caan to reduce the risk of foodborne illness in your community? Does your retail food regulatory program track improvement in food safety practices of foodservice and retail food establishments? Attend this session to obtain an understanding of FDA's current approach to assessing the effectiveness of the nation's retail food protection efforts.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

Thinking Inside the Box: Using Cartoons to Imagineer Food Defense

NEHA attendees are invited to use their imaginative power to envision and design the next cartoon in the food defense series. Participants will engage in a collaborative brainstorming session to identify a scenario and develop the storyline as a professional cartoonist brings these visions to life in a multi-paneled storyboard. By the end of the session, participants, working alongside the cartoonist, will have collaboratively created a complete training cartoon, to be the fifth installment of the current food defense series.

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