Food Safety

Certified Professional - Food Safety (CP-FS) Credential

Certified Professional - Food Safety (CP-FS) Credential - Chefs in commercial kitchen

Who Should Apply?

CP-FS credential holders may be employed in any retail food environment — as a quality assurance or quality control manager, facility manager, food-safe chemical supplier, or in a more traditional food safety position such as a regulatory inspector/investigator. CP-FS holders are able to conduct facility plan reviews, evaluate hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) plans or other risk-based food safety programs, understand the causes and prevention of foodborne illnesses, and analyze and implement sanitation standard operating procedures for safety and effectiveness.

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Eligibility Requirements

  • Degree Track
    • Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent
  • Experience Track
    • Associate’s degree and 4 years of experience, and successful passage of the CPFM, FSMCE, or ServSafe exam
    • High School Diploma and 5 years of experience, and successful passage of the CPFM, FSMCE, or ServSafe exam

This information is a brief overview of the eligibility requirements. For complete details, please see the Candidate Information Brochure (CIB) for more information.

Price

Member: US $245

Non-member: US $390

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CP-FS Credential Exam and Application

Candidate Information Brochure (PDF)

 


A Professional Credential From NEHA

NEHA developed the CP-FS credential to meet the growing need for professionals who have specialized knowledge and training in the protection and safety of food. The importance of food safety is recognized along the continuum of training from food handler to food safety manager, and the next step for professionals who want to advance their careers in food safety is obtaining the CP-FS credential.

The CP-FS credential is designed for individuals within the public and private sectors who have prior food safety experience, and it integrates food microbiology, HACCP principles, and regulatory requirements to validate problem solving and knowledge expertise using real-world examples. This prestigious credential is well respected throughout the industry, and is highly valued by employers when hiring food safety professionals.

As an impartial, third-party endorsement of an individual’s professional knowledge and experience, a credential stands in support of a candidate’s resume and professional references. It serves as verification that a professional has achieved a baseline level of competency in his or her subject matter. Food safety professionals must understand local, state, national, and global regulations that affect their facility operations. The benefit of obtaining a nationally recognized credential is the transferability across state lines, and the requirement for continuing education to maintain the credential ensures that the professional is up-to-date on the most recent changes affecting the industry.

EH Topics: 

Certified in Comprehensive Food Safety (CCFS) Credential

Certified in Comprehensive Food Safety (CCFS) - Woman with clipboard

A Professional Credential From NEHA

NEHA has been training professionals in food safety since 1937 as part of the knowledge and skills required of Registered Environmental Health Specialists/Registered Sanitarians (REHS/RS). NEHA’s well-grounded history in food safety means our standards are high and that individuals with a NEHA credential have mastered a body of knowledge and acquired practical experience to perform relevant work responsibilities.

As an impartial, third-party endorsement of an individual’s professional knowledge and experience, a credential stands in support of a candidate’s resume and professional references. It serves as verification that a professional has achieved a baseline level of competency in his or her subject matter. Food safety professionals must understand local, state, national, and global regulations that affect their facility operations. The benefit of obtaining a nationally recognized credential is the transferability across state lines, and the requirement for continuing education to maintain the credential ensures that the professional is up-to-date on the most recent changes affecting the industry.

Stand Out in the World of Food Safety

The Food Safety Modernization Act has recast the food safety landscape adding to the arsenal of required knowledge for those involved in any aspect of the food supply chain. The National Environmental Health Association’s (NEHA’s) Certified in Comprehensive Food Safety (CCFS) credential is a mark of distinction for more seasoned food safety professionals who aim to demonstrate expertise in the manufacturing and processing areas, whether in a regulatory/oversight role or in a food safety management or compliance position within the private sector.

Hunger for Knowledge

Upon successfully passing the exam, the CCFS credential holder is prepared to manage and evaluate food safety plans in food manufacturing and processing facilities to assure a safe food supply for consumers. They are accomplished in understanding and implementing preventative controls, conducting risk assessments, observing and training staff, assessing the physical facility, and assuring corrective measures are applied to control hazards and prevent foodborne illness. With today’s complex global food supply, ensuring the safety of the supply chain requires collaboration between retail, manufacturing, and food service distribution companies, as well as others. NEHA’s involvement with policy and these types of collaborations in the food industry occurs on many levels and ensures that the food safety credentials it offers serves professionals who work in a variety of settings, is relevant to their jobs, and remains current to keep pace with frequent changes in the industry.

 

CCFS Credential Exam and Application

CCFS Credential Candidate Information Brochure (PDF)

 

EH Topics: 

Verification Times Two: How Do Food Managers Verify Food Safety

As food safety professionals, we have used traditional observational inspection techniques to evaluate a food operation's procedures and training during inspections. Until now, there has not been a clear method for evaluating the verification component of an operation’s food safety systems. This session will engage you in the discovery of FBI risk factors through the use of new behavioral-based food safety interview tools. You'll compare the snapshot observational approach to the discussion/interview approach. Explore how you can integrate these techniques into your daily inspections.

Using Underreporting Estimates to Mobilize the Development of Targeted, Proactive Food Safety Policy

Public health policy targeting populations at greatest risk can be used to significantly reduce the burden of foodborne disease. This study calculated incidence rates, disability adjusted life years, and quality adjusted life years estimates for salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis, adjusted for underreporting. Investigators then looked at how these measures of disease burden can contribute to the policy debate on the public health significance of foodborne disease.

Using FDA's Risk Factor Study to Enhance Retail Food Safety Effectiveness

Do you know if food establishments are doing all they caan to reduce the risk of foodborne illness in your community? Does your retail food regulatory program track improvement in food safety practices of foodservice and retail food establishments? Attend this session to obtain an understanding of FDA's current approach to assessing the effectiveness of the nation's retail food protection efforts.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

 

Thinking Inside the Box: Using Cartoons to Imagineer Food Defense

NEHA attendees are invited to use their imaginative power to envision and design the next cartoon in the food defense series. Participants will engage in a collaborative brainstorming session to identify a scenario and develop the storyline as a professional cartoonist brings these visions to life in a multi-paneled storyboard. By the end of the session, participants, working alongside the cartoonist, will have collaboratively created a complete training cartoon, to be the fifth installment of the current food defense series.

Take the FDA Food Code Challenge!

What do you know about the updates in the Supplement to the 2013 FDA Food Code? How well do you know the FDA Food Code? Play our interactive game in this session to find out how much you know about the Code and get a brief update on the changes that went into the Supplement. Attendees will leave informed with the newest updates and with a sense of what other recommendations and research are on the Code’s horizon.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

Super Bowl XLIX: From Planning to Execution

In 2015, the Maricopa County Environmental Services Department (MCESD) attended to over one million additional visitors to ensure their food safety and security at the Super Bowl. If that weren’t enough, there was also the Pro Bowl, Waste Management Open, and all associated events involving 3 major cities within a 2 week span! Find out what it takes to plan for this kind of large scale event, which agencies to partner with, and how to incorporate technology and social media to facilitate implementation.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

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