Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Florida Department of Health – Brevard County is offering this brief presentation to help guide your goal of reducing drowning incidents in your area by developing a successful drowning prevention awareness program. This presentation will assist how to find ways to fund your program with grant writing, development of partnerships, and the importance of public outreach.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Recreational Waters

Although elevated radon levels in the home are a known cause of lung cancer and public outreach efforts promote radon testing and mitigation when unsafe levels are found, radon data are not standardized among states. This presentation shares the results of a collaborative feasibility study for a publicly accessible database that would standardize state and local radon data sources into a nationally consistent radon information resource. Could a national tracking database drive targeted public health actions in your geographic area?

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Radon

Many agencies have experienced the loss of public health positions in recent years. Salt Lake County has created two initiatives to develop and retain staff and to ensure that vital functions continue when key personnel are lost. This session discusses Succession Planning and Supervisory Internship Programs to build and strengthen a pool of existing talent in the county workforce by developing necessary skills and leadership abilities. Evaluate these approaches and use them as a foundation for initiatives in your organization.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

Every day, thousands of shipments of toxic and radiological chemicals, traverse our highways and railways, as potential “agents of opportunity” for terrorists' use.  This informational session will describe:

 

  1. the public health threats due to Radiological and Chemical "Agents of Opportunity"
  2. the deficiencies in education and training of public health responders to these types of events, and
  3. the development and  relevance of a preparedness course called, "Radiological and Chemical Agents of Opportunity for Terrorism: The Emergency Medicine Response to Toxic Industrial Chemicals and Materials (TICs/TIMs) and Toxic Radiological Materials (TRMs)."
July 2015
Richard Collins, MS, REHS/RS, DAAS
Additional Topics A to Z: Hazards

The Great East Japan Earthquake was the first disaster ever recorded that included an earthquake, a tsunami, a nuclear power plant accident, a power supply failure, and a large-scale disruption of supply chains. Amid the deep devastation and massive recovery efforts, came the challenge of how to collect, store, sort, recycle, and process disaster debris in an efficient and sustainable manner. View this session to learn how this is being done at the largest outdoor Municipal Recycling Facility in operation, and return to your organization with a model for how to work with government and planning departments to permit and build temporary disaster debris processing facilities.

July 2015
Leonard Grossberg, MPA, REHS/RS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00
Additional Topics A to Z: Hazards

Due to population aging and an increase in longevity, there has been a disease transition to non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which are the challenge for the 21st Century. This is a new concept for environmental health and disaster management to explore, as the focus has traditionally been on communicable diseases in the disaster setting.

Today, damages to public health infrastructure such as food, water, and sanitation, place the vulnerable population with NCDs at great risk. In this session we discuss and debate possible approaches to and roles environmental health professionals play in mitigating the risks of disaster.

July 2015
Benjamin Ryan, MPH
Potential CE Credits: 1.00
Additional Topics A to Z: Hazards

Abstract

The objective of this study was to describe changes in carbon monoxide (CO) safety knowledge and observed CO detector use following distribution of a CO detector use intervention in two environments, a pediatric emergency department (Ohio) and an urban community (Maryland). A total of 301 participants completed the 6-month follow up (Ohio: n = 125; Maryland: n = 176). The majority of participants was female, 25–34 years of age, and employed (full or part time). We found that CO safety knowledge did not differ between settings at enrollment, but significantly improved at the follow-up visits. The majority of CO detectors observed were functional and installed in the correct location. Of those with CO detectors at follow up, the majority had not replaced the battery. The success of the intervention varied between settings and distribution methods. The majority of participants showed improved knowledge and behaviors. Improved device technology may be needed to eliminate the need for battery replacement.

May 2017
May 2017
79.9 | 24-30
Lara B. McKenzie, MA, PhD, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, The Ohio State Uni, Kristin J. Roberts, MS, MPH, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Wendy C. Shields, MPH, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Eileen McDonald, MS, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The Dipterans are flies capable of vectoring disease to man by contaminating food and food contact surfaces. This session will provide environmental health professionals with essential knowledge about Dipteran biology and behavior, an understanding of their visual perception, their public health significance, and innovative prevention measures to solve challenging flying insect issues.

July 2015
Stuart Mitchell, DO, PsyD, PhD, MPH, BCE
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

"Doggie Dips" consist of dog owners bringing their pets to the community pool to swim at the conclusion of "human swimming season." They are happening across the country as part of a national trend toward accommodations for pets in regulated environments. Discuss and evaluate the environmental and public health risks of these accommodations in the pool environment. Weigh in on what best practices might be implemented and the role of the EH professional in doing so.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emerging Environmental Health

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