Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Book: HACCP: Managing Food Safety Hazards at the Retail LevelNEHA’s HACCP training materials were created to meet the growing demands on the food service industry to look at risk factors affecting food safety. The HACCP approach to food safety addresses the analysis and control of biological, chemical, and physical hazards through active managerial control within the retail establishment. HACCP: Managing Food Safety Hazards at the Retail Level will walk a food manager step-by-step through creating a workable HACCP plan, as well as prepare individuals for NEHA’s Certified HACCP Manager exam. This book is also a recommended study reference for NEHA's CP-FS exam. 

For more information please contact Trisha Bramwell, tbramwell@neha.org, 303.802.2166

June 2009
Additional Topics A to Z: HACCP

Abstract

Technological waste in the form of electronic waste (e-waste) is a threat to all countries. E-waste impacts health and the environment by entering the food chain in the form of chemical toxicants and exposing the population to deleterious chemicals, mainly in the form of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants. This special report tries to trace the environmental and health implications of e-waste in India. The author concludes that detrimental health and environmental consequences are associated with e-waste and the challenge lies in producing affordable electronics with minimum chemical toxicants.

April 2016
April 2016
78.8 | 18-23
Anwesha Borthakur
Additional Topics A to Z: Sustainability

Article Abstract

Green building systems have proliferated recently, but studies are limited of associated health and housing outcomes. The authors measured self-reported resident physical and mental health, allergens, and building conditions at baseline and one-year follow-up in a low-income housing development being renovated in accordance with green healthy housing improvements (Enterprise Green Communities standards and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design [LEED] gold certification). Self-reported general health in adults significantly improved from 59% to 67% (p = .026), with large statistically significant improvements in water/dampness problems, cockroaches and rodents, and reduced pesticide use. Median cockroach (Bla g1) and mouse (Mus m1) allergen dust loadings showed large and statistically significant reductions from baseline to three months postintervention and were sustained at one year (both p < .05). Energy and water cost savings were 16% and 54%, respectively. Incorporating Enterprise Green Communities and LEED standards in low-income housing renovation improves health and housing conditions and can help to reduce disparities. All green housing standards should include health-related requirements.

March 2014
76.7 | 8-16
David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH, Jill Breysse, MHS, CIH, Sherry L. Dixon, PhD, Susan Aceti, MSW
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Abstract

Drinking groundwater is a significant pathway for human exposure to heavy metals. To evaluate the health effect of some heavy metals ingestion through the groundwater drinking pathway, the authors collected 35 groundwater samples from the drinking water wells of local residents and the exploitation wells of waterworks in Baotou, China. The monitoring results indicate that the groundwater had been polluted by heavy metals in some regions of the study area. A health risk assessment model derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was used to determine the noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic effects to residents who drink groundwater. All the respondents in the study area were at potential risk of carcinogenic health effects from arsenic when using the lowest safe standard for carcinogenic risk (1E-06). The hazard quotient values for noncarcinogenic health risk of arsenic exceeded 1 in 14.3% of the sampling wells in the study area. The research results could provide baseline data for groundwater utilization and supervision in the Baotou plain area.

November 2015
January/February 2016
Prepublished online November 2015. Final publication January/February 2016 (78.6). | 1-7
Liping Bai, Yeyao Wang, Yongli Guo, Youya Zhou

Drinking groundwater is a significant pathway for human exposure to heavy metals. To evaluate the health effect of some heavy metals ingestion through the groundwater drinking pathway, the authors collected 35 groundwater samples from the drinking water wells of local residents and the exploitation wells of waterworks in Baotou, China. The monitoring results indicate that the groundwater had been polluted by heavy metals in some regions of the study area. A health risk assessment model derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was used to determine the noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic effects to residents who drink groundwater. All the respondents in the study area were at potential risk of carcinogenic health effects from arsenic when using the lowest safe standard for carcinogenic risk (1E-06). The hazard quotient values for noncarcinogenic health risk of arsenic exceeded 1 in 14.3% of the sampling wells in the study area. The research results could provide baseline data for groundwater utilization and supervision in the Baotou plain area.

January 2016
January/February 2016
78.6 | 84-90
Liping Bai, Yeyao Wang, Yongli Guo, Youya Zhou
Additional Topics A to Z: Drinking Water

Ebola virus disease presents a frank and obvious health risk to international aid workers in West Africa. More mundane health and safety threats such as malaria, typhoid fever, or vehicle accidents remain despite the disease outbreak. See how environmental health professionals, who are uniquely equipped to address occupational, environmental, health and safety risks, and risk communication, can respond to international health emergencies. This presentation will illustrate the EH role in response to the West African Ebola outbreak.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emergency Preparedness

Abstract

The increasing popularity of powdered shake mixes as nutritional supplements or convenient meal replacements, combined with the complex formulations incorporating multiple ingredients of unknown origin in many of these products, might pose public health risks because of possible contamination with harmful substances such as heavy metals. Our aim was to determine levels of four heavy metals in a select group of popular powdered protein and botanical shake mixes purchased from local stores specializing in sales of whole/organic foods. To measure levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and lead, analyses using inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry were performed. In 56% of the products individually tested, metal levels for one daily serving exceeded the daily thresholds and standards recommended by various regulatory agencies, particularly for rice-based shakes. This study highlights that commercial shake mixes can be a significant source of exposure to toxic heavy metals and emphasizes the need for consumers to limit their exposures to these metals.  

November 2017
November 2017
80.4 | 8-14
Christine F. Skibola, PhD, Emory University School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Jianqing Zhang, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Jacques E. Riby, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Additional Topics A to Z: Hazardous Materials

Pages