Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Article Abstract

The objectives for the study described in this article were to evaluate the fate and transport of onsite wastewater system (OWS)–derived phosphate from a residential system in Beaufort County, North Carolina, and to determine if current OWS setback regulations are sufficient to prevent elevated phosphate discharge to surface waters. Piezometers were installed in nests at different depths adjacent to drainfield trenches and up- and down-gradient of a residential OWS. Groundwater and septic effluent phosphate concentrations, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and electrical conductivity were monitored every two months from February 2011 to October 2011 (five times). The mean groundwater phosphate concentration beneath the OWS (3.05 ± 0.74 mg/L) was not significantly different than septic effluent (2.97 ± 0.76 mg/L) and was elevated relative to background groundwater (0.14 ± 0.12 mg/L). Groundwater phosphate concentrations were inversely related (r2 = .83) to distance from the system. Onsite system setback regulations may have to be increased (>30 m) in some areas to ensure groundwater phosphate concentrations are reduced to background concentrations before discharge to surface waters. 

Jan/Feb 2014
76.6 | 28-33
Charles Humphrey, MS, PhD, REHS, Mike O’Driscoll, MS, PhD, Nancy Deal, MS, REHS, David Lindbo, MS, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

In 2013, FDA initiated its second 10-year study on the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors within foodservice and retail food facilities. This session will provide industry and regulatory food safety professionals with information on specific food safety practices and procedures that are in most need of attention within the retail food segment of the industry. Attendees will be able to assess the underlying issues that impact employee behaviors and food safety practices and to identify potential intervention strategies that are also being assessed as part of the study.

July 2015
John Marcello, REHS/RS, CP-FS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

What we have here is a failure to communicate! Use this session to obtain insights as to why the retail food regulatory inspection process may not be as effective as it could be. Learn how to tailor your communication techniques to make a connection with food worker that will result in positive behavioral change.

July 2015
John Marcello, REHS/RS, CP-FS; Chuck Catlin, MPA, RS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

Article Abstract

The study described in this article evaluated sources of contamination of children’s food and drinking water in rural households in the highlands of Peru. Samples from children’s meals, drinking water, kitchen utensils, and caregivers’ and children’s hands were analyzed for total coliforms and E. coli counts using Petrifilm EC. Thermotolerant coliforms in water were measured using DelAgua test kits while diarrheagenic E. coli were identified using polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR). Thermotolerant coliforms were found in 48% of all water samples. E. coli was found on 23% of hands, 16% of utensils, and 4% of meals. Kitchen cloths were the item most frequently contaminated with total coliforms (89%) and E. coli (42%).  Diarrheagenic E. coli was found in 33% of drinking water, 27% of meals, and on 23% of kitchen utensils. These findings indicate a need to develop hygiene interventions that focus on specific kitchen utensils and hand washing practices, to reduce the contamination of food, water, and the kitchen environment in these rural settings. 

102-106
76.6 | 102-106
Ana I. Gil, MSc, Claudio F. Lanata, MPH, MD, Stella M. Hartinger, MSc, Daniel Mäusezahl, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Drinking Water

This one-of-a-kind center promotes a hands-on approach to education and showcases both conventional systems and a variety of wastewater treatment alternatives. This session will allow you to rotate in small groups through a number of hands-on workstations featuring above ground low-pressure distribution, various tanks and their components, numerous ATUs, media filters, and performance based treatment systems. FOWA’s Executive Director will also brief you on the ground-breaking policy endeavors happening nationwide, who the players are, and the importance of the role of EH professionals in the creation of policy. Includes a catered lunch from Sonny’s BBQ upon arrival. Education 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm at outdoor work stations. 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

Millions of pounds in thrust, a gigantic fire ball, tremendous roaring explosion, zero to 17,000 mph; all this in seconds/minutes. When this all comes together, how do you begin to protect the workers, the viewing public and the environment? Kennedy Space Center stands ready with a full contingent of Emergency Responders, including Fire and Emergency Medical, Security and Law Enforcement, and an Emergency Operations Center that completes the entire Emergency Management Program.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emergency Preparedness

The number of individuals with food allergies in the U.S. continues to rise each year. With recent rulings by the FDA and a host of lawsuits over how food allergic diners are treated in the foodservice industry, it can be a scary subject to approach in a food establishment. This session will cover current regulations and training requirements, provide tools for you to flip the fear, and create a safe atmosphere for those with special dietary needs.

July 2015
Betsy Craig; Kevin McMaster, MBA; Victoria Griffith, CP-FS; David Crownover
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

Dining outside of the home can be difficult for individuals with food allergies, as they must rely on restaurant staff to properly prepare their allergen-free meal. Restaurant managers should prepare for these customers by learning about food allergens and how to respond if an allergic reaction occurs in their establishment. This presentation shares the results of a study to determine restaurant managers' attitudes and knowledge of food allergens. This baseline may inform future educational efforts in this topic area.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H., Deputy Health Officer at District Health Department #2 in Michigan, developed a Children’s Environmental Health Power Point Program with the financial assistance of the Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI.  The Power Points are approximately 25-35 minutes in length, allowing for a presentation to be made during one classroom setting, or to be used for a community presentation, allowing time for Q & A.  Some of the topics include: Sunwise, Body Art, Household Hazardous Waste, Meth, Recreational Water, and more.  They are free to download and use for presentations in your school, health department community presentations, or for media use.  Changes in the presentations should not be made without consent from the author, and/or the NEHA Board of Directors.  

The Food Bourne Illnesses PowerPoint is available via the link listed below:   

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H.
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Pages