Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

The Minneapolis Health Department, state departments of health and agriculture, and community-based partners teamed up to conduct focus groups with urban Somali and Latino residents. The presenters gained insight on why live animal markets, urban living conditions, community trust, beliefs and customs are pivotal factors in reducing foodborne illness. Attendees will be able to describe how understanding cultural assets can change the trajectory of outbreak prevention efforts and will be able to map and apply this approach in their communities.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015

The Food Safety Focus Series objective is to provide information, updates, and a forum for discussion regarding the creation, implementation, and functioning of an integrated food safety system. It includes presenters and participants from every sector and from the Federal level to the local level. This year's series will drill down into the specifics of foodborne illness outbreaks and investigations. 

July 2015

The Food Safety Focus Series objective is to provide information, updates, and a forum for discussion regarding the creation, implementation, and functioning of an integrated food safety system. It includes presenters and participants from every sector and from the Federal level to the local level. This year's series will drill down into the specifics of foodborne illness outbreaks and investigations.   

July 2015

Traceback is a method used to determine and document the distribution and production chain, and the source(s) of a product that has been implicated in a foodborne illness investigation (FBI). This presentation describes the process requiring evidence such as documents/records and related information that would support a regulatory action or public health consumer warning. An example of a multi-state investigation will be provided to walk you through and illustrate the skills necessary for traceback to be successful.

July 2015

Industry and Regulators have a history of seeing food safety from opposite sides of the fence, but it's in their best interest to communicate and collaborate in a food-related crisis. This session will include an overview of NEHA's IFIIT-RR training program as well as some interactive exercises from the course. See how this highly reviewed program improves relations and preparation for outbreak investigations and recalls. Leave with the knowledge and tools to create that in your next food-related crisis.

July 2015

This presentation asserts that it is the human interaction component, not technology or other resources, which can most enhance the efficiency of a foodborne illness investigation. While investigating a local cluster of Salmonella cases, one agency efficiently resolved the outbreak in less than six weeks, with the enlistment of contacts at the state and federal level who had linked the cases to an ongoing multi-state cluster. See how the approach taken in this case study can help your investigations.

July 2015

Critical violations at food facilities are significant risk factors contributing to foodborne illness outbreaks and pose an imminent health threat. One agency has implemented a proactive Food Safety Health Education Liaison Program (HELP) to help facilities that perform poorly over and over. HELP consultations promote effective strategies to reduce repeat critical violations, raise food safety standards, and strengthen operators' active managerial control measures for long-term compliance. Evaluate the program for yourself and come away with effective interventions for repeat violators.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015

Abstract

To assess food safety program performance, the Tennessee Department of Health conducted food service surveys of randomly selected establishments and reviewed routine inspection reports by environmental health specialists (EHSs) of the same facilities. The individual restaurant sanitation scores, along with types and frequencies of violations noted by the survey team, were compared with records from the previous year. In addition, EHSs were observed as they each performed two routine inspections. Survey team staff consistently marked more critical violations than did field EHS staff. Differences between survey teams and field EHS staff in marking critical violations were statistically significant for all 10 critical violations in the first review cycle, 8 in the second cycle, and 7 in the third cycle. Over the course of the review period, there was a small but measurable improvement in scoring by field EHS staff. Marking of critical violations increased, sanitation scores decreased, and discrepancies with survey teams in both areas decreased.

March 2017
March 2017
79.7 | 16-20
Heather Henderson, MPH, DVM, Lori LeMaster, REHS, Craig Shepherd, MPH, REHS/RS, DAAS, John Dunn, DVM, PhD

Public health issues exist on many levels in the legal medical and recreational marijuana industry. Beginning in 2010, the Denver Department of Environmental Health was the first jurisdiction to regulate marijuana-infused foods under its existing food safety program. Presenters will share the lessons learned including understanding the foodborne illness risks, programmatic and enforcement challenges, and communication needs of regulating this rapidly evolving industry. Come away informed on this emerging issue and with a new understanding of regulatory authority.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emerging Environmental Health

Pages