Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Sharptown is located in an agriculturally dominated portion of the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland. Groundwater quality compliance samples have reflected elevated nitrate concentrations for years. Non-point agricultural sources were thought to be the source of the nitrates, but a detailed study as part of an updated Source Water Protection Plan assessment has now revealed a differing and surprising nitrate source interpretation, for which implementing a remedy is much more feasible. During this session you will apply geochemical analysis to water quality compliance data and observe the use of environmental tracers for identifying water contamination sources.

July 2015
Mark Eisner
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

Abstract

Indoor hockey officials might be at high risk of hearing loss at an earlier age because their noise exposures have not been evaluated and officiating can begin as early as 10 years of age. Officials of junior and collegiate hockey leagues in northern Colorado participated in noise dosimetry and pre and postgame pure-tone audiometry to determine if a ≥10 decibels (dB) decrease in hearing sensitivity resulted from noise exposures during the game. All of the officials (N = 23) were exposed to equivalent sound pressure levels ≥85 A-weighted decibels (dBA) and 65% were overexposed based on noise criteria set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Of the sampled officials, 10 of 18 demonstrated a ≥10 dB increase in hearing threshold, seven of whom included shifts in more than one ear and/or frequency and two of whom demonstrated a 15 dB shift. The results of this study suggest exposure to hazardous levels of noise and a possible increased risk for hearing loss among hockey officials.

November 2016
November 2016
79.4 | 22-26
Karin L. Adams, PhD, Ammon Langley, MS, William Brazile, PhD, CIH
Additional Topics A to Z: Injury Prevention

Abstract

Novel indices were developed representing estimated stages in the mosquito life cycle and its ecology, and informed with meteorological data. We used descriptive statistics to identify relationships between meteorological/ecological trends and peak infection rates (IRs), and mixed model linear regression to identify meteorological/ecological trends that were significantly associated with increases in mosquito IRs.

 

Results showed increased mean weekly temperature as a significant driver of increased IRs between 2002 and 2006 during oviposition (the trapping week); the gonotrophic cycle; the egg, larvae, and pupae stage; the development of oviposition sites; and during the over-winter months preceding trapping. Decreases in weekly cumulative precipitation during the last half of the development of oviposition sites, and the egg, larvae, and pupae stage, were significantly associated with increases in IRs. Increased cumulative precipitation during the first half of the development of oviposition sites was significantly associated with increases in IRs. Decreases in the weekly Palmer Drought Index during the development of oviposition sites were significantly associated with increases in IRs.

April 2017
April 2017
79.8 | 16-22
Paul A. Rosile, MPH, PhD, RS, Eastern Kentucky University, Michael Bisesi, PhD, The Ohio State University College of Public Health

Abstract

Cosmetologists face a variety of occupational health and safety challenges. To gather information on respiratory issues related to work as a cosmetologist, licensed cosmetologists were invited by e-mail to participate in a short online survey. The survey collected demographic data, work history, respiratory symptoms, product usage, and health and safety training. Results revealed that while 57% of cosmetologists reported having received training on customer or consumer safety, only 10.5% had received training on worker health such as work-related asthma and/or breathing issues. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 46% of respondents. Length of employment and the use of glues or adhesives were associated with a diagnosis of asthma.

May 2017
May 2017
79.9 | 8-14
Kathleen G. Norlien, MS, CPH, Asthma Program, Minnesota Department of Health, Adrienne Landsteiner, MPH, PhD, Center for Occupational Health and Safety, Minnesota Department of Health, Allan Williams, MPH, PhD, Center for Occupational Health and Safety, Minnesota Department of Health, Angeline Carlson, PhD, RPH, Data Intelligence Consultants, LLC

Abstract

The main objective of this research was to ascertain the association between organizational characteristics of local health departments (LHDs) and environmental health (EH) services rendered in the community. Data used for the analysis were collected from LHDs by the National Association of County and City Health Officials for its 2013 national profile study of LHDs. We analyzed the data during 2016. Apart from understanding basic characteristics of LHDs in the nation, we introduced new measures of these characteristics, including “EH full-time equivalents” per 100,000 population and “other revenue” (revenues from fees and fines) per capita.

The association of these and other organizational characteristics with EH services were measured using likelihood ratio χ2 and t-tests. Out of 34 EH services considered, LHDs directly provided an average of 12 different services. As many as 41% of the 34 EH services were not available in more than 10% of the communities served by LHDs. About 70% of communities received some services from organizations other than LHDs. All the available organizational characteristics of LHDs had association with some of the EH services. Although we might assume an increase in per capita expenditure could result in an increase in LHDs’ direct involvement in providing EH services, we found it to be true only for five (15%) of the EH services. The variation of EH services provided in communities could be explained by a combination of factors such as fee generation, community needs, type of governance, and population size.

April 2018
April 2018
80.8 | 20-29
Shailendra N. Banerjee, PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Justin A. Gerding, MPH, REHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, John Sarisky, MPH, REHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

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