Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Children spend hours every day in child care, yet environmental health is rarely on the radar screen there. This presentation will share results of a January 2015 report on how state laws and regulations are most effectively addressing key indoor environmental quality (IEQ) issues in licensed child care facilities. It will also highlight the best policy strategies for states to consider and describe notable non-regulatory initiatives being implemented by state agencies. Get free resources to build capacity in your area.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Climate change will bring myriad environmental health challenges: worse air pollution, wildfires, and floods are just some examples. Viewing these threats through a public health lens is a powerful way to engage other stakeholders as well as the public. This session will share proven methods for creating and sustaining inter-agency partnerships to successfully tackle climate change through achieving common goals.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015

Marijuana use has been legalized in some form in 34 states and the District of Columbia. Most of the laws limit prosecution of users, but are silent when discussing the affect on the EH regulatory community. This session will explore the impacts legalized marijuana has already had and will continue to have on the EH community.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Emerging Environmental Health

Abstract

On July 9, 2013, an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease (LD) was identified at Long-Term Care Facility A in central Ohio. This article describes the investigation of the outbreak and identification of the outbreak source, a cooling tower using an automated biocide delivery system. In total, 39 outbreak LD cases were identified; among these, six patients died. Water samples from a cooling tower were positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, reactive to monoclonal antibody 2, with matching sequence type to a patient isolate. An electronic control system turned off cooling tower pumps during low-demand periods, preventing delivery of disinfectant by a timed-release system, and leading to amplification of Legionella in the cooling tower. Guidelines for tower maintenance should address optimal disinfection when using automated systems.

December 2015
December 2015
78.5 | 8-13
Celia Quinn, MPH, MD, Alicia Demirian, MMSc, MD; Louise Francois Watkins, MPH, MD; and Sara Tomczyk, MSc, PHN, Claressa Lucas, PhD; Ellen Brown; Natalia Kozak-Muiznieks, PhD; and Laurel E. Garrison, MPH, Jasen Kunz, MPH
Additional Topics A to Z: Pathogens and Outbreaks

This session will describe the steps taken by Alexandria Health Department to implement the 2013 FDA Food Code. It will take participants on a journey from the internal decision to adopt, through the engagement of industry and stakeholders, to adoption and through final implementation. The presentation will review the methods of communication and training approaches adopted during the change process. Attendees will be able to apply the presenters’ best practices for implementation in their next cycle of change.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015

Abstract

Lung cancer is largely preventable by eliminating tobacco smoke and radon exposure. This exploratory study assessed the relationships of demographic factors, including having one or more smokers living in the household, and a) lung cancer worry and b) completion of home screening for radon and secondhand smoke (SHS) among renters. A convenience sample of renters (N = 47) received free test kits for radon and SHS as part of a larger study. Demographic factors, lung cancer worry, and completion of home testing were assessed at baseline. The sample was mostly Caucasian (68%), female (62%), and educated beyond high school (70%). The average age was 43 years (SD = 15), and roughly half lived with at least one smoker (49%). Gender, race/ethnicity, education, and whether they had smokers in the home accounted for 35% of the variability in lung cancer worry, F(4, 42) = 5.6, p = .001. Lung cancer worry was associated with lower level of education, b = 0.77; SE(b) = 0.32, and having at least one smoker living in the home, b = 0.71; SE(b) = 0.31. Renters tested their homes for radon and SHS whether they had smokers in the home or not. Constructing and delivering educational messages that target low-educated populations may promote radon testing and smoke-free homes.

January 2017
January/February 2017
79.6 | 8-13
Ellen J. Hahn, PhD, RN, FAAN, Marissa Hooper, RN, Carol Riker, MSN, RN, Karen M. Butler, DNP, RN

Abstract

This study compared the effectiveness of using a commercially available robotic mop versus hand mopping as the second step of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s recommended three-step vacuum–mop–vacuum process to remove lead dust debris from residential floors. A total of 1,703 floors were cleaned using the robotic mop. Lead dust wipe tests from these floors were compared with 995 lead dust wipe tests for floors cleaned with hand mopping. Analysis of the dust wipes showed that cleaning floors with a robotic mop resulted in a clearance failure rate significantly lower than that obtained by cleaning floors by hand (4.8% versus 10.0%; p < .05). The use of newer technologies like robotic mops can help improve the efficiency and thoroughness of floor-cleaning efforts, as well as decrease costs associated with re-cleaning floors following regulated renovations.

September 2016
September 2016
79.2 | 8-12
Lisa Smestad, REHS, Alexander Vollmer, REHS, Jennifer Tschida, REHS, Angeline Carlson, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Hazardous Materials

To address the need for more qualified Environmental Health Science professionals in the workforce, the presenters attempted to identify students who would be satisfied and successful with an undergraduate major in EHS. The current study attempted to do this by developing and validating an Environmental Health Science Career Interest Test. Come see how the results could assist in recruiting environmental public health majors and building a foundation for long, fruitful careers.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

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