Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

From 2003-2010, the Water Environment Research Foundation administered an $8 million USEPA-ORD grant which identified the need to educate small community elected and appointed officials on sanitation systems. A comprehensive tool called “Wastewater Basics for Small Community Leaders and Planners” was published, but insufficient funding to publicize and implement it has kept it unknown to many. This presentation will share the document and guide attendees in its use and application as an effective tool in education and resource management.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

Abstract

A study examining the relationship between housing conditions, respiratory health, and school absenteeism was conducted in the city of Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada. As part of this study, a survey was completed by 3,424 parents of children in grades 3 and 4 to determine the a) relationship between self-reported visible mold in homes and tested airborne mold; b) relationships of self-reported visible mold, tested airborne mold, and asthma and/or persistent colds; c) school absenteeism rates due to asthma and/or persistent colds; and d) children’s socioeconomic status (SES) and incidence of asthma and/or persistent colds. In addition, a complete inspection of a subset of 715 homes was conducted, including the collection of over 1,400 indoor and 500 outdoor air samples for mold analysis. Results indicate a significant association between self-reported visible mold and airborne mold. Additionally, a significant association was found between Cladosporium levels from air samples (the most common genus type found) and children’s asthma in combination with persistent colds. Children with persistent colds in combination with asthma miss significantly more school than children who have only asthma or only persistent colds. Children from poorer families reported more persistent colds than children from high-income families. No association was found between income and asthma. Furthermore, SES was not a significant factor for number of school days missed.

March 2017
March 2017
79.7 | 28-35
Eleoussa Polyzoi, PhD, Dimos Polyzois, PhD, FEC, PEng, Theo Koulis, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Abstract

The number of children in daycare centers (DCCs) is rising. This increases exposure to microorganisms and infectious diseases. Little is known about which bacteria and viruses are present in the DCC environment and where they are located. In the study described in this article, the authors set out to determine the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses and to find the most contaminated fomites in DCCs. Fifteen locations in each DCC were sampled for bacteria, respiratory viruses, and gastrointestinal viruses. The locations were in the toilet, kitchen, and playroom areas and included nursery pillows, toys, and tables, among other things. Coliform bacteria were primarily found in the toilet and kitchen areas whereas nasopharyngeal bacteria were found mostly on toys and fabric surfaces in the playroom. Respiratory viruses were omnipresent in the DCC environment, especially on the toys.

October 2015
78.3 | 24-29
Tobias Ibfelt, Eva Hoy Engelund, Anders Permin, Jonas Stenlokke Madsen
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Abstract

The American Healthy Homes Survey, June 2005—March 2006, measured levels of lead and arsenic in homes nationwide. Based on a three-stage cluster sample of 1,131 housing units, key statistically weighted estimates of the prevalence of lead-based paint (LBP) and LBP hazards associated with paint, dust, and soil, and arsenic in dust and soil, were as follows: 37.1 million homes (35%) had some LBP; 23.2 million (22%) had one or more LBP hazards; 93% of the homes with LBP were built before 1978. The highest prevalence of LBP and LBP hazards was in the Northeast and Midwest. Over three million homes with children under six years of age had LBP hazards, including 1.1 million low-income households (<$30,000/yr.). Less than 5% of homes had detectable levels of arsenic in dust (≥5 μg/ft2). Arsenic in soil (for homes with yard soil) averaged 6.6 parts per million (ppm). Many homes had soil arsenic levels of 20 ppm or greater, including 16% of homes with wooden structures in the yard and 8% of homes without such structures.

December 2015
December 2015
78.5 | 22-29
F. Gary Dewalt, MBA, PhD; David C. Cox, MS, MSc, PhD; Robert O’Haver; Brendon Salatino; and Duncan Holmes, Peter J. Ashley, DrPH; Eugene A. Pinzer, MS, CIH; and Warren Friedman, PhD, CIH, David Marker, PhD; Susan M. Viet, PhD, CIH; and Alexa Fraser, PhD

Abstract

Recent research suggests that the resurgence of bed bugs in the U.S. has occurred at an alarming rate. Assumptions have been made that socioeconomic status is not associated with the prevalence of bed bug infestations. Little information is available at the local level, however, about the prevalence of bed bugs in private homes. The authors’ pilot study aimed to identify prevalence, knowledge, and concern about bed bugs in one higher income village in Ohio utilizing survey methodology. Responses from 96 individuals who completed the Prevalence, Knowledge, and Concern About Bed Bugs survey were utilized for analysis. The majority of the sample respondents were white and 95% reported that they owned their residence. Only 6% knew someone with bed bugs. Additionally, 52% reported they were somewhat concerned about bed bugs. About 46% reported that they had changed their behavior. For a higher income area, the prevalence was dissimilar to the rate reported in the general public (about 20%). This suggests that bed bugs may be an environmental issue effecting low-income populations disproportionately. Further research is needed in areas of differing socioeconomic levels.

 

July/August 2015
78.1 | 20-24
Mary Beth Kaylor, MPH, PhD, APHN-BC, CNE, RN, Paul Wenning, RS , Christopher Eddy, MPH, REHS, RS, CP-FS

Professional Food Manager

For any foodservice operation to manage its risk effectively, managers must learn basic food safety principles, apply that information on the job every day, and pass a Conference for Food Protection/ American National Standards Institute (CFP/ANSI)-approved examination. NEHA's Professional Food Manager, Fifth Edition, supplies culinary and hospitality professionals and students with the knowledge to pass the CFP/ANSI-approved exam while helping to ensure the continued successful execution of food safety best practices in the workplace.

 

This book provides vital information on topics such as the principles of food safety management and how to use those principles to create a food safety culture. It also provides information on how to identify and avoid different contaminants; the importance of cleaning and sanitizing; latest information on reportable diseases; guidelines to follow before, during, and after an inspection; and a new chapter on HACCP.

The new fifth edition Professional Food Manager has been improved to:

  • Use instructional design practices for improved learning/retentions
  • Align with American Culinary Federation Education Foundation competencies
  • Prepare candidates for CFP-approved food manager exams (e.g., Prometric, National Registry, ServSafe, etc.)
  • Include an all-new instructor guide and companion classroom materials
  • Offer volume discounts for NEHA Food Safety Instructors
  • Conform to the 2015 FDA Food Code Supplement

 

Current and prospective managers needing food safety manager certification, as well as those who are already certified and seeking a refresher on best practices in food safety, will find Professional Food Manager, Fifth Edition to be an invaluable resource for achieving their goals and putting the outlined food safety principles to work.

PURCHASE PROFESSIONAL FOOD MANAGER (Fifth EDITION)

 

Publication Information:
Professional Food Manager (Fifth Edition)
National Environmental Health Association, Inc. (2017)
166 pages, paperback

Additional Topics A to Z: CP-FS

Pages