Water Quality

Council for the Model Aquatic Health Code Voting Guide

Vote on the Code!

The Model Aquatic Health Code provides national guidance for the creation and updating of  aquatic facility regulations around the country. The Council for the Model Aquatic Health Code (CMAHC) works to regularly update the MAHC through the collection and analysis of  code change requests. This allows for the collection and analysis of data-driven, science-based information from public health and aquatic industry experts and helps to keep the MAHC current, sustainable, easily understood and implemented. 

Every other year, The CMAHC invites public health and industry leaders to gather at the Vote on the Code Biennial Conference for discussion and member voting on new language and content for the MAHC. The next vote is coming up this October 17 & 18th at the Vote on the Code Conference, held in conjunction with the World Aquatic Health Conference. This year, there are 179 change requests that are up for voting by the CMAHC membership. NEHA has reviewed the requests and identified 66 that likely or possibly have environmental public health impacts. An overview of those change requests can be found below or printed for an easy voting reference.  A larger voting guide for the environmental public health elements is also available,which includes the rationale for the decision and future action to be taken. The full listing of all change requests is also available.






Change Request #

Summary

Relevance to Environmental Health

TRC Recommendation

NEHA Recommendation

4.2.2.2.2-0001 Revises definition for paint as indoor VOC vapor retarder. Possible YES YES
4.2.2.3.3.1-0001 Revises language around air handling system codes. Possible NO NO
4.2.2.4.5-0001 Adds latching to door reference. Possible YES YES
4.5.1.1-0001 Revises language for aquatic venue shape. Possible YES YES
4.5.3.2-0001 Further defines swimouts. Possible YES YES
4.5.4-0001 Standardizes stair requirements. Possible YES YES
4.5.4.2-0001 Standardizes stair requirements. Possible YES YES
4.5.4.6-0001 Standardizes stair requirements. Possible NO NO
4.5.12.4-0001 Clarifies language for projections/obstructions. Possible YES YES- as modified
4.5.16.3-0001 Improves underwater bench definition. Possible NO NO
4.5.16.5-0001 Limits hydrotherapy jets to spas and therapy pools. Possible NO NO
4.5.17.4-0001 Clarifies definition of underwater ledges. Possible NO NO
4.5.18-0001 Eliminates allowance for underwater shelves. Likely NO NO
4.5.19.1.6.2-0001 Adds requirement for rope designation between pool areas. Possible NO NO
4.5.19.2.4-0001 Clarifies depth marker units. Possible NO NO
4.6.1.6.1-0001 Clarifies lighting requirements.  Possible NO NO
4.7.1.6.2.1.4-0001 Adds annex section on SCRS devices. Possible YES YES
4.7.3.-0001 Adds allowance for new filtration technology. Possible NO NO
4.7.3.2.1.3-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely YES YES
4.7.3.2.1.3-0002 Eliminates loopholes for chemical feeder requirements. Likely NO NO
4.7.3.2.2.2-0003 Eliminates free available chlorine dosing requirement. Possible YES YES
4.7.3.2.2.3-0002 Eliminates free available chlorine dosing requirement. Possible YES YES - as modified
4.7.3.3.1.2-0001 Provides alternatives to secondary disinfection for small pools. Possible NO NO
4.7.3.3.2-0001 Change secondary disinfection requirements. Possible YES YES- as modified
4.7.3.3.2-0002 Clarifies full flow treatment. Possible YES YES- as modified
4.7.3.3.3.3-0001 Require UV secondary treatment for splash/spray areas. Likely YES YES- as modified
4.7.3.3.3.4-0001 Require shutdown if UVT is less than minimum transmissivity.  Likely YES YES- as modified
4.7.3.3.5-0001 Secondary treatment filtration options. Possible NO NO
4.7.4.1.1-0001 Clarify language on filtration. Possible YES YES
4.8.1.6.7-0001 Limits wing wall use. Possible NO NO
4.8.2.2.4-0002 Stair requirement for 3m diving stands. Possible NO NO
4.8.4-0001 Stair requirement for pool slide. Possible NO NO
4.8.5.3.2-0002 Clarifies lifeguard chair requirements. Possible NO NO
4.8.6.3.7-0002 Additional latching requirements. Possible YES YES
4.12.5.2.2-0002 Adapts lazy river lifeguarding operations. Possible YES YES
5.7.1.1.1.1-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely YES YES
5.7.1.1.1.1.3-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely NO NO
5.7.2.2.4.1.1-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely YES YES- as modified
5.7.3.1.3-0001 Add requirements for stabilizer certification. Possible YES YES- as modified
5.7.3.1.3.2-0001 Lower CA stabilizer limit. Likely ABSTAIN YES
5.7.3.1.5.1-0001 Add requirement for pool grade salt. Possible YES YES- as modified
5.7.3.2.2-0001 Addition for ozone generator feedback. Possible NO NO
5.7.3.2.2.6-0001 Compressed oxygen NSF 50 Possible NO NO
5.7.3.3.2-0001 Add NSF/ANSI certification requirement. Possible YES YES- as modified
5.7.3.4.1-0001 Reduce minimum pH to 6.8. Possible NO NO
5.7.3.4.2-0001 Add NSF/ANSI certification requirement. Possible YES YES
5.7.3.7.8-0001 Require continuous monitoring of UVT. Possible YES Yes
5.7.5.1-0001 Notation of FAC or ORP/HRR prior to opening each day. Possible NO NO
5.8.5.3.1-0001 Addresses lifeguard UV exposure. Possible YES YES
5.8.5.3.2-0001 Provides guidance on spinal injury board construction. Possible YES YES
5.8.5.3.9-0002 Ensure provision of needed lifeguard equipment. Possible YES YES
5.12.2.1-0001 Ensure easy access to lifejackets. Likely YES YES
6.0.1-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely YES YES
6.0.1.6.1-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely NO NO
6.2.1.2.6.3-0001 Ensure lifeguard instructors maintain high training quality. Possible NO NO
6.2.1.2.6.4-0001 Ensure lifeguard instructors maintain high training quality. Possible NO NO
6.2.1.3.3-0001 Ensure lifeguard instructor is present for entire course. Possible YES YES
6.3.1.2.5-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely NO NO
6.3.2-0001 Clarifies needed number of lifeguards. Possible YES YES
6.3.2.1-0001 Facility attributes requiring qualified lifeguards. Possible YES YES
6.3.2.1-0002 Facility attributes requiring qualified lifeguards. Possible NO NO
6.3.4.4.1-0001 Clarifies needed number of lifeguards. Possible YES YES
6.4.1.4.3-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely YES YES
6.4.1.6-0001 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely YES YES- as modified
6.5.3.2.1-0001 Alter crypto/diarrhea hyperchlorination protocol. Possible YES YES
6.6.3.1-0002 Protocols to mitigate chlorine gas exposure. Likely NO NO
EH Topics: 

Tribal Water Program Improvement Resource Kit

Tribal Water Program Improvement Resource Kit

The resources collected below can be useful in creating or improving private drinking water programs. 

For environmental health professionals or homeowners that are new to private drinking water wells, we recommend taking free Private Well Class. The Private Well Class is being provided to NEHA at no-charge by the Illinois State Water Survey and the Illinois Water Resources Center at the University of Illinois. The funding for the Private Well Class program comes from the USEPA through a cooperative agreement with the Rural Community Assistance Partnership. Originally intended for well owners, this course has proven to be a resource for EH professionals for basic well and groundwater understanding. The class consists of 10 courses that can be taken in sequence or individually and are eligible for one (1) CE each from NEHA.


Community Outreach & Risk Communication

Methods of Effective Homeowner Outreach

Well Water Community Action Toolkit

Groundwater

Protection Our Water: Preventing Contamination 

Source Water Assessment & Protection 

Partnership & Stakeholder Development

Partnership Contact List

Potential Stakeholders

Stakeholder Mapping

Policy & Regulation Development

Drafting Tribal Public Health Law & Policy

Components of a Local Well Construction Ordinances
 

Private Well Testing & Test Interpretation

Interpreting Test Results

Private Well Testing - Connecticut


Program Development

Community Environmental Health Assessments

Community Environmental Health Assessment Toolbox - New Mexico

Indian Community Health Profile Project Toolkit

Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health (PACE EH)

Performance Standards

Core Competencies for Environmental Health Professionals

Environmental Public Health Perfomance Standards 2.0

Program Assessment

Environmental Health Program Assessment Tool

Private Drinking Water Program Assessment Tool

Quality Improvement

Roadmap to Culture of Quality Improvement

Worksheets 


Technical Resources

Arsenic Contamination Removal

Coliform and Bacteria in Private Wells

Nitrates in Drinking Water Wells

PFOA & PFOS Advisory

Private Well Disinfection 

Private Well Flood Recovery

Radium in Drinking Water

EH Topics: 

Small Systems Monthly Webinar Series

The montly webinar series is providing a forum for EPA to communicate directly with state personnel and other drinking water small systems professionals, which allows EPA to provide training and foster collaboration and dissemination of information.

This month: Decision Support Methodology for Small Systems to Evaluate and Select Treatment Technologies.

NYS CEHD Fall Meeting

The annual fall meeting of the NYS Conference of Environmental Health Directors is scheduled to be held at the Hampton Inn & Suites Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York. The meeting format includes a full day technical session on current environmental health issues and regulatory updates, followed by a half day business meeting providing member committee reports.

Southern California Joint Technical Symposium

Less than 2 months remain until the 2017 Southern California Joint Technical Symposium on Wednesday, October 18th, 2017 at our New Location The Carson Center in Carson, California.

There is still time to take advantage of discounted early bird rates:

  • Attendee Registration (save $50) 
  • Exhibitor Registration (save $100) 
    • There are also Sponsor & Exhibitor Opportunities

Discounts are available for Groups of 3+ attendees, save $100, e-mail jts@caljts.com for more details.

Hurricane and Flooding Disasters

Flood Recovery

Resources to Protect and Restore Community Health

When flood waters recede, communities are often left with contaminated water supplies, nonfunctioning septic tanks, mold, increased vectors and pests,  spoiled food, and temporary shelters and housing.  Ensuring the proper information reaches community members and supports environmental health professionals  is essential in the efforts to restore communities and protect public health. The following resources provide best practices around flood recovery related to environmental health.

Floods and Public Health

CDC Water Sanitation & Hygiene for Flood Waters

Hospital and Healthcare Facilities

AHRQ Hospital Assessment and Recovery Guide (PDF)

Community Resources

CDC Flood Water Home Clean-up

Drinking Water

U.S. EPA Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

Private Wells

Minnesota Department of Health Well and Water System Disinfection for Private Drinking Water Wells

Septic Systems

U.S. EPA Septic Systems - What to Do After a Flood

Mold

U.S. EPA Mold Clean-up After Floods

Food Safety

FDA Food and Water Safety During Power Outages and Floods

Emergency Preparedness & Response Training 

CDC Environmental Health Training in Emergency Response Awareness level (online) and Operations level (in-person) training.

Flood Recovery Worker and Volunteer Safety

CDC Worker Safety After Floods

OSHA Natural Disaster Recovery

Vector Control

Pan-American Health Organization Vector Control in Disaster Situations

Infection Prevention

Infection Prevention and Control for Shelters During Disasters (PDF) by APIC Emergency Preparedness Committee

Rebuilding Homes

Rebuild Healthy Homes: Guide to Post-disaster Restoration for a Safe and Healthy Home (PDF) by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes

Storm Safety

https://www.ul.com/code-authorities/buildingsafetyprograms/storm-safety/  This site provides storm preparedness, safety after the storm, and rebuilding safely after a storm information. This is provided courtesy of Underwriters Laboratories (UL)

 

Pages