Water Quality

Recreational Water

Healthy Swimming and Recreational Waters

Pools, water parks, and other water-related venues are great sources of fun and exercise, however, with aquatic activities there are risks of waterborne illness and injury. 

Pools and similar facilities can harbor pathogens that make us sick, and sometimes the chemicals intended to inactivate these pathogens can irritate our skin, eyes and lungs.  Fortunately, most of these risks are preventable.  Environmental health professionals can work with aquatic-industry leaders and the public to minimize these risks so we can all enjoy the benefits of recreational water safely.

 

CDC's Healthy and Safe Swimming Week May 22 - 28, 2017   

According to the US Census, there are over 30 million swimmer visits each year in the United states. CDC's Healthy and Safe Swimming (HSS) week helps create awareness around potential illness and injuries that can occur when enjoying recational waters. The 2017 HSS Week toolkit contains a cover letter, community outreach suggestions, list of resources, sample press release, sample op-ed, sample proclamation, and suggested social media messages that are available and free to use.

Health and Safe Swimming Week Toolkit


Aquatic Healthy and Safety Infographic

NEHA Aquatic health and safety infographic

Download Aquatic Healthy and Safety InfographiC (PDF) 


NEW! CDC Updates the MAHC

The updated MAHC incorporates revisions that were suggested at the bi-annual Council for the Model Aquatic Health Code (CMAHC). The suggestions were categorized, opened for discussion to the CMAHC membership, reviewed again and accepted revisions are added to the MAHC. The CDC website offers a variety of ways to review the changes made as well as PDF versions of the revised code.

The Model Aquatic Health Code

Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC)

MAHC is a collaborative effort of public health, academia, and industry. By providing a model code based on the latest science, the MAHC strives to keep swimming healthy and protect individuals, families, and communities from preventable waterborne diseases and injuries. The MAHC encourages stakeholder involvement, so please make your swimming pool program aware of the following resources and opportunities to get involved.

Updated Model Code Now Available! 
CDC has released an updated 2016 version of the MAHC. The review process is organized by the Council for the Model Aquatic and will be done bi-annually.

To learn more about the MAHC, view the 2015 AEC presentation:

ACT ON THE MAHC  


Meet the CMAHC

The Council for the Model Aquatic Health Code (CMAHC) will serve as a key CDC partner by serving as a national clearinghouse for gathering stakeholder input and advice on needed improvements to the MAHC. Consider joining today.

Questions? Email mahc@cdc.gov


EH20 Recreational Water Virtual ConferenceEH2O Recreational Water Virtual Conference Logo Beach Ball and Water Drop

NEHA is excited to announce its second virtual conference, which will focus on recreational water, happening January 18 and 19, 2017!

The EH2O Conference is designed to enhance the knowledge of environmental health professionals in order to help them better prepare to respond to environmental events of public health concern as well as to bring professionals together in a unique virtual environment to exchange information and discover new solutions to issues in recreational water and public health.

Conference content will include topics such as

  • Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC);
  • aquatic facilities;
  • research on aquatic facilities;
  • new technologies in recreational water;
  • lessons learned;
  • inspection successes; and
  • stories from the field, among others.

LEARN MORE ABOUT EH2O VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

 

Call for Abstracts

The abstract submission period is now open and will remain open until October 28 at 7pm EST. 

VIEW ABSTRACT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES (PDF)

EH Topics: 

World Aquatic Health Conference

The WAHC is a scientific conference, attracting a wide range of leading thinkers and professionals involved in the aquatic industry. These include, aquatic facility owners and operators, service providers, consultants, parks & recreation, water parks, manufacturers, academia, associations, builders, community organizations, hotels, government, media, retail, distributors, and health/medical field professionals.

Call to Action: Support Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment

Show Your Support for Safe and Clean Water

Every American has the right to safe and clean drinking water. Let's take positive steps so that the tragedy that occurred in Flint, MI will not happen again.

Take action by contacting your elected officials to support a new amendment, led by Michigan Democratic Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters.  

NEHA urges all of us to contact our U.S. Senators to support this important amendment to assure that all Americans have safe and clean drinking water.

 

Support Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment

Show Your Support for Safe and Clean Water

Every American has the right to safe and clean drinking water. Let's take positive steps so that the tragedy that occurred in Flint, MI will not happen again.

Take action by contacting your elected officials to support a new amendment, led by Michigan Democratic Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters.  

NEHA urges all of us to contact our U.S. Senators to support this important amendment to assure that all Americans have safe and clean drinking water.

Background:

In 2014, Flint, Michigan’s drinking water supply was switched from Lake Huron water treated in Detroit to water from the Flint River treated at the Flint water treatment plant in order to reduce costs.

The new supply was not treated with required corrosion control chemicals and the water caused lead and pathogens to get into the town's water supply from corroding pipes. Researchers from Virginia Tech concluded that lead levels were high enough to be designated as "toxic waste." The Justice Department has also opened an investigation.

In a recent letter to President Barack Obama, the Governor of Michigan, Rick Snyder estimates it would cost $767,419,500 to replace Flint’s water system — a long, costly process that some think is necessary because, without it, residents there couldn’t get clean water.

In early February a proposal by Michigan Democratic Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters is being offered that would steer $400 million toward the lead-contaminated drinking water of Flint, Michigan ensuring that the process of replacing the pipes and getting Flint’s water supply safely back on line.

Contact Your Senators

Please join us in contacting your senators. You can find them here. 

Thanks for your support - we cannot do this work without you!


Sample Tweet

Support the Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment. Find your Senators & download a letter of support here: http://bit.ly/1QIORxe


Sample Facebook/LinkedIn Post

Call to Action! Join NEHA in supporting the Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment to ensure that mistakes, like what has taken place in Flint, Michigan, don't happen again. Find your Senators and download a letter of support here: http://bit.ly/1QIORxe


Sample Newsletter Blurb

Voice Your Support for the Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment  

Now is the time to contact your Senators to let them know how important it is to monitor the public's drinking water to ensure that mistakes -like those that have taken place in Flint, Michigan- never occur again. The Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment does just that, and NEHA stands behind it. NEHA has put together a toolkit for you to take advantage of, where you can find sample social media posts, a downloadable letter of support, as well as a plug-in that makes it easy to find your state's representatives. Please visit http://bit.ly/1QIORxe today, and show your elected officials that you support the Safe and Clean Drinking Water Amendment. 

 

 

EH Topics: 

Creating Online Septic System Owner's Guides

This free online webinar with discuss a new online tool available for anyone to develop customized septic system owner’s guides. With over 25% of the US population being served by septic systems and that percentage on the rise, the need for proper management is a key issue to accelerate adoption of current technologies and improve existing onsite wastewater treatment systems. This project provides an online vehicle for wastewater professionals to transform rural wastewater management by developing a customizable Community System Owner’s Guide (CSOG).

2016 Onsite Wastewater Mega-Conference

NOWRA -- the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association -- is the organizing partner for the 2016 Onsite Wastewater Mega-Conference, to be held October 26-29, 2016 at the Nugget Resort in Reno, NV. Partners in the event as of Mid-January include the Florida Onsite Wastewater Association (FOWA) and the National Association of Wastewater Technicians (NAWT). Additional partnerships with industry organizations are anticipated. At least 400 industry professionals are expected to attend.

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