journal

Going Public: Early Disclosure of Food Risks for the Benefit of Public Health

Abstract

Often during an outbreak of foodborne illness, there are health officials who have data indicating that there is a risk prior to notifying the public. During the lag period between the first public health signal and some release of public information, there are decision makers who are weighing evidence with the impacts of going public. Multiple agencies and analysts have lamented that there is not a common playbook or decision tree for how public health agencies determine what information to release and when. Regularly, health authorities suggest that how and when public information is released is evaluated on a case-by-case basis without sharing the steps and criteria used to make decisions. Information provision on its own is not enough. Risk communication, to be effective and grounded in behavior theory, should provide control measure options for risk management decisions. There is no indication in the literature that consumers benefit from paternalistic protection decisions to guard against information overload. A review of the risk communication literature related to outbreaks, as well as case studies of actual incidents, are explored and a blueprint for health authorities to follow is provided.

Speaker / Author: 
Benjamin Chapman, PhD
Maria Sol Erdozaim
Douglas Powell, PhD
Month Year: 
March 2017
Volume#: 
79.7
Page #: 
8-14
Publication Month: 
March 2017
EH Topics: