Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Abstract

The goal of this study was to gain a better understanding of the link between groundwater nitrate concentrations and various land uses in North Carolina. Groundwater nitrate data from wells across North Carolina were summarized for each county. Land-use characteristics for each county including acreage and fraction of land in agriculture, population and population density, total number and density of septic systems, and the numbers and densities of various livestock (poultry, hogs, and cattle) were computed. Land-use characteristics for the 10 counties with the highest and lowest mean nitrate concentrations were compared to determine if significant differences in land-use characteristics accompanied differences in nitrate concentrations. Data indicated that counties with the highest average nitrate concentrations had more acreage and a higher fraction of their land in agriculture and higher numbers and densities of livestock. There were statistically significant correlations among average nitrate concentrations and acreage and fraction of land in agriculture and numbers and densities of livestock. Efforts to implement best management practices for reducing nitrate loss from agricultural fields is suggested especially in the Inner Coastal Plain of North Carolina where the highest mean concentrations of nitrate in groundwater were located.

 

May 2018
May 2018
80.9 | 16-23
Emily Naylor, MSEH, REHS, Stokes County Environmental Health , Charles Humphrey, PhD, REHS, Environmental Health Sciences Program, East Carolina University, Tim Kelley, PhD, Environmental Health Sciences Program, East Carolina University, Leslie Easter, REHS, Stokes County Environmental Health
Additional Topics A to Z: Drinking Water

January 2010: a 7.0 earthquake hit Haiti, destroying its capital of Port-au-Prince, killing over 200,000 people. The recovery is ongoing. Tent camps were dismantled as citizens went back to some kind of home. But nearly 150,000 people still live in the shanty structures erected post disaster. Basic sanitation is a daily struggle. This talk will address the tragic reintroduction of cholera, share the ad hoc approaches to sanitation in Haiti, and the role EH professionals MUST play in disaster situations.

 

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

Article Abstract

The objectives for the study described in this article were to evaluate the fate and transport of onsite wastewater system (OWS)–derived phosphate from a residential system in Beaufort County, North Carolina, and to determine if current OWS setback regulations are sufficient to prevent elevated phosphate discharge to surface waters. Piezometers were installed in nests at different depths adjacent to drainfield trenches and up- and down-gradient of a residential OWS. Groundwater and septic effluent phosphate concentrations, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and electrical conductivity were monitored every two months from February 2011 to October 2011 (five times). The mean groundwater phosphate concentration beneath the OWS (3.05 ± 0.74 mg/L) was not significantly different than septic effluent (2.97 ± 0.76 mg/L) and was elevated relative to background groundwater (0.14 ± 0.12 mg/L). Groundwater phosphate concentrations were inversely related (r2 = .83) to distance from the system. Onsite system setback regulations may have to be increased (>30 m) in some areas to ensure groundwater phosphate concentrations are reduced to background concentrations before discharge to surface waters. 

Jan/Feb 2014
76.6 | 28-33
Charles Humphrey, MS, PhD, REHS, Mike O’Driscoll, MS, PhD, Nancy Deal, MS, REHS, David Lindbo, MS, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

In 2013, FDA initiated its second 10-year study on the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors within foodservice and retail food facilities. This session will provide industry and regulatory food safety professionals with information on specific food safety practices and procedures that are in most need of attention within the retail food segment of the industry. Attendees will be able to assess the underlying issues that impact employee behaviors and food safety practices and to identify potential intervention strategies that are also being assessed as part of the study.

July 2015
John Marcello, REHS/RS, CP-FS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

What we have here is a failure to communicate! Use this session to obtain insights as to why the retail food regulatory inspection process may not be as effective as it could be. Learn how to tailor your communication techniques to make a connection with food worker that will result in positive behavioral change.

July 2015
John Marcello, REHS/RS, CP-FS; Chuck Catlin, MPA, RS
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

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