Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Article Abstract

The study described in this article evaluated sources of contamination of children’s food and drinking water in rural households in the highlands of Peru. Samples from children’s meals, drinking water, kitchen utensils, and caregivers’ and children’s hands were analyzed for total coliforms and E. coli counts using Petrifilm EC. Thermotolerant coliforms in water were measured using DelAgua test kits while diarrheagenic E. coli were identified using polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR). Thermotolerant coliforms were found in 48% of all water samples. E. coli was found on 23% of hands, 16% of utensils, and 4% of meals. Kitchen cloths were the item most frequently contaminated with total coliforms (89%) and E. coli (42%).  Diarrheagenic E. coli was found in 33% of drinking water, 27% of meals, and on 23% of kitchen utensils. These findings indicate a need to develop hygiene interventions that focus on specific kitchen utensils and hand washing practices, to reduce the contamination of food, water, and the kitchen environment in these rural settings. 

102-106
76.6 | 102-106
Ana I. Gil, MSc, Claudio F. Lanata, MPH, MD, Stella M. Hartinger, MSc, Daniel Mäusezahl, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Drinking Water

The number of individuals with food allergies in the U.S. continues to rise each year. With recent rulings by the FDA and a host of lawsuits over how food allergic diners are treated in the foodservice industry, it can be a scary subject to approach in a food establishment. This session will cover current regulations and training requirements, provide tools for you to flip the fear, and create a safe atmosphere for those with special dietary needs.

July 2015
Betsy Craig; Kevin McMaster, MBA; Victoria Griffith, CP-FS; David Crownover
Potential CE Credits: 1.00

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H., Deputy Health Officer at District Health Department #2 in Michigan, developed a Children’s Environmental Health Power Point Program with the financial assistance of the Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI.  The Power Points are approximately 25-35 minutes in length, allowing for a presentation to be made during one classroom setting, or to be used for a community presentation, allowing time for Q & A.  Some of the topics include: Sunwise, Body Art, Household Hazardous Waste, Meth, Recreational Water, and more.  They are free to download and use for presentations in your school, health department community presentations, or for media use.  Changes in the presentations should not be made without consent from the author, and/or the NEHA Board of Directors.  

The Food Bourne Illnesses PowerPoint is available via the link listed below:   

Chuck Lichon, R.S., M.P.H.
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

The Food Safety Focus Series objective is to provide information, updates, and a forum for discussion regarding the creation, implementation, and functioning of an integrated food safety system. It includes presenters and participants from every sector and from the Federal level to the local level. This year's series will drill down into the specifics of foodborne illness outbreaks and investigations. 

July 2015

The Food Safety Focus Series objective is to provide information, updates, and a forum for discussion regarding the creation, implementation, and functioning of an integrated food safety system. It includes presenters and participants from every sector and from the Federal level to the local level. This year's series will drill down into the specifics of foodborne illness outbreaks and investigations.   

July 2015

Traceback is a method used to determine and document the distribution and production chain, and the source(s) of a product that has been implicated in a foodborne illness investigation (FBI). This presentation describes the process requiring evidence such as documents/records and related information that would support a regulatory action or public health consumer warning. An example of a multi-state investigation will be provided to walk you through and illustrate the skills necessary for traceback to be successful.

July 2015

Industry and Regulators have a history of seeing food safety from opposite sides of the fence, but it's in their best interest to communicate and collaborate in a food-related crisis. This session will include an overview of NEHA's IFIIT-RR training program as well as some interactive exercises from the course. See how this highly reviewed program improves relations and preparation for outbreak investigations and recalls. Leave with the knowledge and tools to create that in your next food-related crisis.

July 2015

This presentation asserts that it is the human interaction component, not technology or other resources, which can most enhance the efficiency of a foodborne illness investigation. While investigating a local cluster of Salmonella cases, one agency efficiently resolved the outbreak in less than six weeks, with the enlistment of contacts at the state and federal level who had linked the cases to an ongoing multi-state cluster. See how the approach taken in this case study can help your investigations.

July 2015

Abstract

To assess food safety program performance, the Tennessee Department of Health conducted food service surveys of randomly selected establishments and reviewed routine inspection reports by environmental health specialists (EHSs) of the same facilities. The individual restaurant sanitation scores, along with types and frequencies of violations noted by the survey team, were compared with records from the previous year. In addition, EHSs were observed as they each performed two routine inspections. Survey team staff consistently marked more critical violations than did field EHS staff. Differences between survey teams and field EHS staff in marking critical violations were statistically significant for all 10 critical violations in the first review cycle, 8 in the second cycle, and 7 in the third cycle. Over the course of the review period, there was a small but measurable improvement in scoring by field EHS staff. Marking of critical violations increased, sanitation scores decreased, and discrepancies with survey teams in both areas decreased.

March 2017
March 2017
79.7 | 16-20
Heather Henderson, MPH, DVM, Lori LeMaster, REHS, Craig Shepherd, MPH, REHS/RS, DAAS, John Dunn, DVM, PhD

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