Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Article Abstract

Growing societal interest to permit animals into retail food outlets presents both risks and benefits to the dining public and consumers. This article summarizes a literature review that evaluated the associated potential public health issues related to this subject. Using the EBSCOhost research protocol and Google search engines between March 2010 and June 2011, the authors have compiled and synthesized scientific research articles, empirical scientific literature, and publicly available news media. While pets are known carriers of bacteria and parasites, among others, the relative risk associated with specific pet-human interactions in the dining public has yet to be established in a clear and consistent manner. Much of the available health-risk-factor evidence reflects pets in domestic conditions and interaction with farm animals. Special consideration is recommended for vulnerable populations such as children, asthmatics, the elderly, pregnant women, and the immunocompromised. 

December 2013
76.5 | 24-30
David T. Dyjack, DrPH, CIH, Jessica Ho, RD, Rachel Lynes, MPH, Jesse C. Bliss, MPH
Additional Topics A to Z: Food Safety

Come learn about how environmental public health (EPH) professionals can help elevate the importance of EPH programs within their health department. Participants will have the opportunity to learn from experienced peers about the connections between EPH and public health accreditation and the steps EPH professionals can take to identify types of documentation that their health department may use to help meet public health accreditation.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Workforce Development

In recent years nitrogen in the environment has become a nationwide concern due to the sensitivity of many water bodies to excess nitrogen loading from many different sources, including Onsite Wastewater Systems (OWS). Complimentary to the Florida Onsite Sewage Nitrogen Reduction Strategies study, the Colorado School of Mines evaluated denitrification via subsurface via a soil treatment unit (STU). This presentation will share the rates of denitrification achieved and how to substantially increase them. See how the onsite wastewater treatment system design plays a key role in the removal of nitrogen.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Wastewater

The Rabies Prevention Program at the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) recognized that their annual laboratory testing data wasn’t working for them or their constituents, even though they were publicly available. They collaborated with the Bureau of Laboratories and the Department's GIS office to develop a user-friendly mapping application - Rabies By The Numbers. Learn how the information is being leveraged to benefit all stakeholders, and how your data could do the same for you.

Presented at NEHA 2015 AEC

July 2015
Additional Topics A to Z: Zoonotic Diseases

Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people’s level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested.

Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report.

January 2016
January/February 2016
78.6 | 102-106
Winnie Cheng, MET
Additional Topics A to Z: Radon

Article Abstract

In the study discussed in this article, 27 private drinking water wells located in a rural Colorado mountain community were sampled for radon contamination and compared against (a) the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) proposed maximum contaminant level (MCL), (b) the U.S. EPA proposed alternate maximum contaminate level (AMCL), and (c) the average radon level measured in the local municipal drinking water system. The data from the authors’ study found that 100% of the wells within the study population had radon levels in excess of the U.S. EPA MCL, 37% were in excess of the U.S. EPA AMCL, and 100% of wells had radon levels greater than that found in the local municipal drinking water system. Radon contamination in one well was found to be 715 times greater than the U.S. EPA MCL, 54 times greater than the U.S. EPA AMLC, and 36,983 times greater than that found in the local municipal drinking water system. According to the research data and the reviewed literature, the results indicate that this population has a unique and elevated contamination profile and suggest that radon-contaminated drinking water from private wells can present a significant public health concern.  

August 2015
November 2013
76.4 | 18-24
Michael Anthony Cappello, MPH, PhD, REHS, Aimee Ferraro, MPH, PhD, Aaron B.Mendelsohn, MPH, PhD, Angela Witt Prehn, PhD
Additional Topics A to Z: Radon

Abstract

On October 2, 2014, the Douglas County Health Department (DCHD) Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (LPPP) received a 61 μg/dL venous blood lead concentration (VBLC) report describing a 3-year-old female refugee. A VBLC above 45 µg/dL in a child less than 72 months requires an aggressive medical and lead hazard exposure intervention because encephalopathy risk is increased. To achieve these intervention objectives, LPPP managers must determine which LPPP stakeholders can respond, contact the parent/guardian and property owner, alert the LPPP stakeholder network, assess lead hazards in the victim’s environment, ensure the victim has a lead-safe dwelling, and monitor critical medical (e.g., treatment prognosis, VBLC reports, treatment discharge date, etc.) and environmental interventions (e.g., assure all lead-safe environment tasks are completed). This special report describes the DCHD protocol developed to ensure rapid environmental health responses to severe pediatric lead poisoning.

 

July 2018
July/August 2018
81.1 | 22-28
Larry W. Figgs, MPH, PhD, REHS/RS, Douglas County Health Department, Amy Bresel, DC, Douglas County Health Department, Khari Muhammad, Douglas County Health Department

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