Topics A to Z

As part of NEHA's continuos effort to provide convenient access to information and resources, we have gathered together for you the links in this section. Our mission is "to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all,” as well as to educate and inform those outside the profession.

Abstract

The number of children in daycare centers (DCCs) is rising. This increases exposure to microorganisms and infectious diseases. Little is known about which bacteria and viruses are present in the DCC environment and where they are located. In the study described in this article, the authors set out to determine the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses and to find the most contaminated fomites in DCCs. Fifteen locations in each DCC were sampled for bacteria, respiratory viruses, and gastrointestinal viruses. The locations were in the toilet, kitchen, and playroom areas and included nursery pillows, toys, and tables, among other things. Coliform bacteria were primarily found in the toilet and kitchen areas whereas nasopharyngeal bacteria were found mostly on toys and fabric surfaces in the playroom. Respiratory viruses were omnipresent in the DCC environment, especially on the toys.

October 2015
78.3 | 24-29
Tobias Ibfelt, Eva Hoy Engelund, Anders Permin, Jonas Stenlokke Madsen
Additional Topics A to Z: Children's Environmental Health

Abstract

The American Healthy Homes Survey, June 2005—March 2006, measured levels of lead and arsenic in homes nationwide. Based on a three-stage cluster sample of 1,131 housing units, key statistically weighted estimates of the prevalence of lead-based paint (LBP) and LBP hazards associated with paint, dust, and soil, and arsenic in dust and soil, were as follows: 37.1 million homes (35%) had some LBP; 23.2 million (22%) had one or more LBP hazards; 93% of the homes with LBP were built before 1978. The highest prevalence of LBP and LBP hazards was in the Northeast and Midwest. Over three million homes with children under six years of age had LBP hazards, including 1.1 million low-income households (<$30,000/yr.). Less than 5% of homes had detectable levels of arsenic in dust (≥5 μg/ft2). Arsenic in soil (for homes with yard soil) averaged 6.6 parts per million (ppm). Many homes had soil arsenic levels of 20 ppm or greater, including 16% of homes with wooden structures in the yard and 8% of homes without such structures.

December 2015
December 2015
78.5 | 22-29
F. Gary Dewalt, MBA, PhD; David C. Cox, MS, MSc, PhD; Robert O’Haver; Brendon Salatino; and Duncan Holmes, Peter J. Ashley, DrPH; Eugene A. Pinzer, MS, CIH; and Warren Friedman, PhD, CIH, David Marker, PhD; Susan M. Viet, PhD, CIH; and Alexa Fraser, PhD

Abstract

Recent research suggests that the resurgence of bed bugs in the U.S. has occurred at an alarming rate. Assumptions have been made that socioeconomic status is not associated with the prevalence of bed bug infestations. Little information is available at the local level, however, about the prevalence of bed bugs in private homes. The authors’ pilot study aimed to identify prevalence, knowledge, and concern about bed bugs in one higher income village in Ohio utilizing survey methodology. Responses from 96 individuals who completed the Prevalence, Knowledge, and Concern About Bed Bugs survey were utilized for analysis. The majority of the sample respondents were white and 95% reported that they owned their residence. Only 6% knew someone with bed bugs. Additionally, 52% reported they were somewhat concerned about bed bugs. About 46% reported that they had changed their behavior. For a higher income area, the prevalence was dissimilar to the rate reported in the general public (about 20%). This suggests that bed bugs may be an environmental issue effecting low-income populations disproportionately. Further research is needed in areas of differing socioeconomic levels.

July 2015
July/August 2015
78.1 | 20-24
Mary Beth Kaylor, MPH, PhD, APHN-BC, CNE, RN, Paul Wenning, RS , Christopher Eddy, MPH, REHS, RS, CP-FS

Professional Food Manager

For any foodservice operation to manage its risk effectively, managers must learn basic food safety principles and apply that information on the job every day. NEHA's Professional Food Manager, Sixth Edition, supplies food, beverage, culinary, and hospitality employees with the knowledge needed to ensure food safety in the workplace.

This book provides information on topics such as the principles of food safety management and how to use those principles to create a food safety culture.

The Professional Food Manager, Sixth Edition is updated to the 2017 FDA Food Code.

  • Aligns with American Culinary Federation Education Foundation competencies.
  • Prepares candidates for CFP-approved food manager exams (e.g., Prometric, National Registry, ServSafe, etc.).

Publication Information:
Professional Food Manager, Sixth Edition
Copyright © by National Environmental Health Association, Incorporated. All rights reserved.
166 pages, paperback

Additional Topics A to Z: CP-FS

Article Abstract

Growing societal interest to permit animals into retail food outlets presents both risks and benefits to the dining public and consumers. This article summarizes a literature review that evaluated the associated potential public health issues related to this subject. Using the EBSCOhost research protocol and Google search engines between March 2010 and June 2011, the authors have compiled and synthesized scientific research articles, empirical scientific literature, and publicly available news media. While pets are known carriers of bacteria and parasites, among others, the relative risk associated with specific pet-human interactions in the dining public has yet to be established in a clear and consistent manner. Much of the available health-risk-factor evidence reflects pets in domestic conditions and interaction with farm animals. Special consideration is recommended for vulnerable populations such as children, asthmatics, the elderly, pregnant women, and the immunocompromised. 

December 2013
76.5 | 24-30
David T. Dyjack, DrPH, CIH, Jessica Ho, RD, Rachel Lynes, MPH, Jesse C. Bliss, MPH
Additional Topics A to Z: Food Safety

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