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Factors Influencing Radon Mitigation Behaviors Among Utah Residents

Abstract

For most individuals, the greatest proportion of radon exposure occurs in the home. Residential radon exposure, however, can be minimized through testing and mitigation. The purpose of our study was to explore mitigation behaviors among individuals who learned their home had high levels of radon (?4.0 pCi/L or 148 Bq/m3). We enrolled participants (N = 110) from among individuals who visited the Utah County Health Department to purchase a radon test kit. Of those participants with a residential radon level ?4.0 pCi/L (31%), only 23% performed mitigation within approximately four months after they learned their homes had high radon levels. Traits such as older age, identifying as female, and magnitude of radon level appeared to be associated with performing radon mitigation. Inconvenience and cost appeared to be reasons for not performing radon mitigation. Our findings add to a growing number of studies that document a gap between testing, mitigation, and associated factors. These factors might be best addressed by multifaceted interventions that address policies, risk perception, cost, and other barriers.


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Speaker / Author:
James D. Johnston, MSPH, PhD, CIH, Department of Public Health, Brigham Young University
Siena F. Davis, MPH, CPH, CHES, Department of Public Health, Brigham Young University
Gabriel S. Ghanadan, Department of Public Health, Brigham Young University
Andrea M. Jensen, CHES, AE-C, Division of Environmental Health, Utah County Health Department
Bryce C. Larsen, MPA, LEHS, Division of Environmental Health, Utah County Health Department
John D. Beard, MPH, PhD, Department of Public Health, Brigham Young University
Month Year:
October 2021
Volume#:
84.3
Page #:
22-30
Publication Month:
October 2021
Subtopic:
Radon