journal

Carbon Monoxide Exposure and Reported Health Conditions Among Filling Station Attendants in Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract

High carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations can elicit adverse health effects. We assessed CO concentrations at filling stations and determined carboxyhemoglobin (%COHb) levels and health problems reported by filling station attendants (FSAs) via questionnaires. This cross-sectional design studied 20 filling stations from Ibadan North Local Government, Nigeria. Outdoor CO concentrations (ppm) were measured for 8 weeks in August–September 2015 from 8:00–10:00 a.m. and 12:00–2:00 p.m., and %COHb levels were measured among 100 FSAs. Data collected were analyzed using Student’s t-test and analysis of variation (p = .05) and compared with relevant guideline limits. Mean CO concentrations in morning (15.4 ± 2.1 ppm) and afternoon (11.6 ± 1.4 ppm) were higher (p < .01) than the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline of 9.0 ppm. Mean %COHb for FSAs (11.1 ± 2.6) was significantly higher (p < .01) than the WHO guideline of 2.5%. Among respondents, 13.4% of FSAs vomited and 14.9% of FSAs experienced nausea. FSAs need personal protective equipment and filling stations should modernize pump delivery systems to minimize exposures.

 

Speaker / Author: 
Godson R.E.E. Ana, MEng, MPH, PhD, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan
Toluwanimi M. Oni, MPH, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan
Derek G. Shendell, MPH, DEnv, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, New Jersey Safe Schools Program, Rutgers School of Public Health
Month Year: 
July 2020
Volume#: 
83.1
Page #: 
26-31
Publication Month: 
July/August 2020
EH Topics: