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An Estimate of the Economic Burden of Norovirus Disease Among School-Age Children in the United States (2009–2013)

Abstract

The health burden and resultant economic burden of foodborne norovirus disease among school-age children in the U.S. is unknown but believed to be significant. The economic burden encompasses not only direct medical costs associated with medical care but also indirect costs such as loss of work days and direct nonmedical costs. National passive surveillance data from norovirus outbreaks spanning 2009–2013 were used to identify cases, health outcomes, interventions, and healthcare resource utilization among the school-age population. The cost of supportive care was $2,483,379, outpatient healthcare was $57,672, hospitalization was $48,670, and emergency care was $38,336. The cost of providing supportive care (direct nonmedical costs) was relatively low. When indirect costs were factored in, however, the total cost of care escalated, which illustrates the high burden of loss of productivity. It is important to incorporate the indirect and direct nonmedical costs of disease to more accurately characterize the total economic burden of a disease.Link: NEHA members: Login and download issue for free. All others: Purchase issue online.
Media reps: Contact community@neha.org.Speaker / Author: Margaret M. Venuto, MA, MPH, DrPH, University of Texas School of Public Health, San Antonio Regional CampusSharon P. Cooper, PhD, University of Texas School of Public Health, San Antonio Regional CampusHasanat Alamgir, PhD, University of Texas School of Public Health, San Antonio Regional CampusMonth Year: March 2018Volume#: 80.7Page #: 12-18Publication Month: March 2018Subtopic: Children's Environmental Health