Agenda

Preliminary Agenda for reference only

*all times in EDT

June 7, Day 1

12–2 pm: Welcome Message, Keynote Address, and General Session

  • Keynote Address
  • FDA Panel facilitated by State/Local Regulator
  • Getting Buy-In of SLTT Decision-Makers and Staff
2–2:15 pm: Break*
 
2:15–3:15 pm: Track Sessions
  • Track 1: Roadmap for Success with RPS; Why enroll in RPS?
  • Track 2: Technology to Assist with Maintenance of RPS Records/Supporting Docs
  • Track 3: Sustaining RPS Activities/Having a Succession Plan
3:15–3:30 pm: Break*
 
3:30–4:30 pm: Exhibit Hall**
 
4:30–4:45 pm: Break*
 
4:45–5 pm: Wrap-Up Session

June 8, Day 2

12–2 pm: Welcome Message and General Session
  • Public Health Metric/Risk Factor Study
  • Successful Intervention Strategies
2–2:15 pm: Break*
 
2:15–3:15 pm: Track Sessions
  • Track 1: What is initial Self-Assessment; SA/VA Gap Analysis Tool; Continuous Strategic Improvement Plan (CSIP) 
  • Track 2: Self-Assessment & Verification Audit Resources; How to Find an Auditor
  • Track 3: Mentorship Program
3:15-3:30 pm: Break*
 
3:30–4:30 pm: Exhibit Hall**
 
4:30–4:45 pm: Break*
 
4:45–5 pm: Wrap-Up Session

June 9, Day 3

12–2 pm: Welcome Message and General Session
  • NEHA-FDA RFFM Grant Portal; Deliverables
  • Successful Grant Writing
  • Facilitated Panel Discussion including Regulators, Industry, Consumer Advocacy Representative, etc. to discuss what has been shared during this RPSS that is important to Stakeholders
2–2:15 pm: Break*
 
2:15–3:15 pm: Track Sessions
  • Track 1: Mentorship Programs
  • Track 2: What Does a Retail Program Standards Coordinator Do?
  • Track 3: RPS Networks/Champions
3:15–3:30 pm: Break*
 
3:30–4:30 pm: Exhibit Hall**
 
4:30–4:45 pm: Break*
 
4:45–5 pm: Wrap-Up Session

*Break Rooms

Navigators Room

This room will be open during breaks throughout the Symposium to provide guidance and instructions to participants. For example, an attendee can find out what track(s) would be most appropriate based on their jurisdiction’s current status with the Retail Program Standards.

Retail Program Standards (RPS) Resources and Support Room

This room will be open during breaks throughout the Symposium to provide information and support to attendees who want to learn more about the Retail Program Standards and the NEHA-FDA Retail Flexible Funding Model grant program.

**Exhibit Hall

Standard 1: Regulatory Foundation

This standard applies to the regulatory foundation used by a retail food program. A regulatory foundation includes any statute, regulation, rule, ordinance, or other prevailing set of regulatory requirements that governs the operation of a retail food establishment. The desired outcome of this standard is the adoption of a sound, science-based regulatory foundation for the public health program and the uniform regulation of industry.

Standard 2: Trained Regulatory Staff

This standard applies to the essential elements of a training program for retail food regulatory program staff. The desired outcome of this Standard is a trained regulatory staff with the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct quality inspections.

Standard 3: Inspection Program Based on HACCP Principles

This standard applies to the utilization of HACCP principles to control risk factors in a retail food inspection program. The desired outcome of this standard is a regulatory inspection program that focuses on the status of risk factors, determines, and documents compliance and targets immediate and long-term correction of out-of-control risk factors through active managerial control.

Standard 4: Uniform Inspection Program

This standard applies to the jurisdiction’s internal policies and procedures established to ensure uniformity among regulatory staff in the interpretation of regulatory requirements, program policies and compliance/enforcement procedures. The desired outcome is a quality assurance program exists that ensures uniform, high-quality inspections.

Standard 5: Foodborne Illness and Food Defense Preparedness and Response

This standard applies to the surveillance, investigation, response, and subsequent review of alleged food related incidents and emergencies, either unintentional or deliberate, which results in illness, injury and outbreaks. The desired outcome is a systematic approach for the detection, investigation, response, documentation, and analysis of alleged food-related incidents that involve illness, injury, unintentional or deliberate food contamination.

Standard 6: Compliance and Enforcement

This standard applies to all compliance and enforcement activities used by a jurisdiction to achieve compliance with regulations. The desired outcome is an effective compliance and enforcement program that is implemented consistently to achieve compliance with regulatory requirements.

Standard 7: Industry and Community Relations

This standard applies to industry and community outreach activities used by a retail food regulatory program to solicit a broad spectrum of input about a retail food regulatory program’s previous, current, and future activities; communicate sound public health food safety principles; and foster and recognize community initiatives focused on the reduction of foodborne illness risk factors. The desired outcome is enhanced communication with industry and consumers through forums designed to solicit input to improve the retail food regulatory program. A further outcome is the reduction of foodborne illness risk factors through educational outreach and cooperative efforts with stakeholders.

Standard 8: Program Support and Resources

This standard applies to the program resources (budget, staff, equipment, etc.) necessary to support an inspection and surveillance system that is designed to reduce risk factors and other factors known to contribute to foodborne illness. The desired outcome of this standard is that resources are available to support a risk-based retail food safety program designed to reduce the risk factors known to contribute to foodborne illness.

Standard 9: Program Assessment

This standard applies to the process used to measure the success of a jurisdiction’s program in reducing the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors to enhance food safety and public health in the community. The desired outcome is to enable managers to measure their program against national criteria and to demonstrate improvement in food safety. The process identifies program elements that may require improvement or be deserving of recognition.

Administrative Procedures   

This exhibit will focus on the general procedures for enrolling in the Standards, remaining an active participant in the Standards, and resolving issues associated with the interpretation and application of the Standards.

Mentorship

This exhibit will focus on the importance of the mentee-mentor relationship, whether formal or informal, to an enrolled jurisdiction’s success with the Standards. Best practices and lessons learned will be shared by current and previous participants in NACCHO’s Program Standards Mentorship. Support and resources will be available for both mentors and mentees.

Comprehensive Strategic Improvement Plan (CSIP)

This exhibit will focus on the Comprehensive Strategic Improvement Plan (CSIP), a project plan based on the results of a completed self-assessment that guides the work of the regulatory retail food program toward meeting the requirements of the Standard(s) not met. The plan may also include tasks related to the maintenance of Standards in full conformance.

National Environmental Public Health Internship Program (NEPHIP)

The National Environmental Public Health Internship Program (NEPHIP) is a paid internship opportunity that links environmental health undergraduate and graduate students from environmental health academic programs accredited by the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council (EHAC), with funded internship placements at qualified State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial (STLT) environmental public health agencies. For the past seven years, we have offered this program in partnership with CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health to help environmental health student interns gain valuable work experience, develop meaningful professional relationships, and ultimately introduce them to the many diverse and rewarding career opportunities that exist in STLT environmental public health departments following graduation. Through this program, we recruit qualified interns and health departments, and matches them based on student’s interest and health department’s project portfolio.
 
Be sure to visit our booth and check out our booth materials to learn more about this program!