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Predictors of Radon Testing Among Utah Residents Using a Theory-Based Approach

Abstract

Exposure to radon continues to be a leading cause of lung cancer despite the availability of effective testing and mitigation options. This study examined differences in beliefs about radon testing among radon testers (n = 110) and a comparison sample of residents (n = 198) in Utah County, Utah, which is a high radon area. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze relationships between radon testing status and self-efficacy, knowledge, behavioral modeling, and risk perception. Risk perception (0.20, p< .04), self-efficacy (0.30, p< .01), and knowledge (0.40, p< .001) were positively associated with testing. Behavioral modeling was indirectly associated with testing through intervening pathways of self-efficacy (z = 1.97, p< .05) and knowledge (z = 2.57, p = .01). The results imply that increasing radon knowledge and self-efficacy, along with traditional intervention efforts focusing on risk perception, might be important factors to increase radon testing in residential areas.


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Speaker / Author:
Siena F. Davis, MPH, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
James D. Johnston, PhD, CIH, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
Brianna M. Magnusson, PhD, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
M. Lelinneth B. Novilla, MPH, MD, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
Breanna K. Torgersen, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
Abigail J. Schnell, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
AliceAnn Crandall, PhD, Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University
Month Year:
January 2018
Volume#:
80.6
Page #:
20-27
Publication Month:
January/February 2018
Subtopic:
Radon